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DnaAngel

i5 3570k lifespan

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Haven't posted here in quite some time, figured I would ask a nagging question to clean some cobwebs..

 

 

I have a PC that I have been using for an Pseudo-workstation and was curious as to the lifespan of an overlocked i5.

 

Currently I have it at 4.4ghz @ 1.21v. Would love to get it to 5Ghz 24/7, but some of the research I did had people pushing 1.37-1.41v to get that. My question is would running it at say 1.4v 24/7 "fixed" kill the lifespan of this thing? As long as I can get 3 years out of it, I would be happy with that.

 

Running the Xigmatek Dark Knight II cooler. at 1.31v 4.7ghz I only touched into the mid-upper 60's temp wise (Celsius), CPU Coolers fan was only at around 65~% speed. So long as I keep the temps in check, should I be fine for that level of OC? If so what max temps should I be cautious of?

 

Asus Maximus V Formula

I5 3570k

G.Skill DDR3 2200 Mhz

Asus DirectCU II GTX 660Ti @ 1264 Mhz Boost

Edited by DnaAngel

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Hey DNA.  That's an impossible question to answer.  There isn't any formula for effectively and accurately predicting the life span of an overclocked processor.  It's pretty much up to the luck of the draw and how hard it's pushed (voltage and heat).

 

If you're adverse to having a failure within three years, then your best best is to be happy at 4.4Ghz with very reasonable voltages and great temps.  Look at it another way - what benefit(s) are you gaining by running it at 5Ghz???

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I'd say with a large degree of certainty that 3 years would be cake walk at such a modest overclock, even 5ghz would probably be fine but you should be just fine at that current level

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Really depends on a bunch of factors such as heat and voltage, quality of power. Number one thing is heat; your CPU may not last long if you regularly exercise thermal limits (around 90c-100c) frequently.

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It comes down to use.  If you want a slap on the back and a hooray then you will burn it out.

 

I have found that an OC makes no difference to any of my games, so as he said, what are you trying to achieve?

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Haven't posted here in quite some time, figured I would ask a nagging question to clean some cobwebs..

 

 

I have a PC that I have been using for an Pseudo-workstation and was curious as to the lifespan of an overlocked i5.

 

Currently I have it at 4.4ghz @ 1.21v. Would love to get it to 5Ghz 24/7, but some of the research I did had people pushing 1.37-1.41v to get that. My question is would running it at say 1.4v 24/7 "fixed" kill the lifespan of this thing? As long as I can get 3 years out of it, I would be happy with that.

 

Running the Xigmatek Dark Knight II cooler. at 1.31v 4.7ghz I only touched into the mid-upper 60's temp wise (Celsius), CPU Coolers fan was only at around 65~% speed. So long as I keep the temps in check, should I be fine for that level of OC? If so what max temps should I be cautious of?

 

Asus Maximus V Formula

I5 3570k

G.Skill DDR3 2200 Mhz

Asus DirectCU II GTX 660Ti @ 1264 Mhz Boost

First thing I would ask is there a need for the boost. Your system now should be fast enough for a great experience. Also what do you mean by 24/7. There are two ways to look at this and each has different answers. If you are running a typical system at these speeds with no power offs, that is very different from a 24/7 system that is folding or mining at 100% usage 24/7.

 

If the later then you are running a higher risk of a failure than the former.

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Really depends on a bunch of factors such as heat and voltage, quality of power. Number one thing is heat; your CPU may not last long if you regularly exercise thermal limits (around 90c-100c) frequently.

I'd worry about voltage a lot more than heat. A CPU will last a very long time running at 90 C 24/7...

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Really depends on a bunch of factors such as heat and voltage, quality of power. Number one thing is heat; your CPU may not last long if you regularly exercise thermal limits (around 90c-100c) frequently.

I'd worry about voltage a lot more than heat. A CPU will last a very long time running at 90 C 24/7...

 

Yep, Intel knows how crappy their coolers are lol.

 

My Q9450 probably is still going strong and that sucker lived over 80C

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First thing I would ask is there a need for the boost. Your system now should be fast enough for a great experience. Also what do you mean by 24/7. There are two ways to look at this and each has different answers. If you are running a typical system at these speeds with no power offs, that is very different from a 24/7 system that is folding or mining at 100% usage 24/7.

Asus DirectCU II GTX 660Ti @ 1264 Mhz Boost

 

If the later then you are running a higher risk of a failure than the former.

 

 

Those are some great points Ed, and I'd like to piggy back on those thoughts.  Other considerations would be whether the user has set a static cpu frequency & voltage or whether they are using dynamic voltage control and frequency stepping (i.e. power saving features).

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First thing I would ask is there a need for the boost. Your system now should be fast enough for a great experience. Also what do you mean by 24/7. There are two ways to look at this and each has different answers. If you are running a typical system at these speeds with no power offs, that is very different from a 24/7 system that is folding or mining at 100% usage 24/7.

Asus DirectCU II GTX 660Ti @ 1264 Mhz Boost

 

If the later then you are running a higher risk of a failure than the former.

 

 

Those are some great points Ed, and I'd like to piggy back on those thoughts.  Other considerations would be whether the user has set a static cpu frequency & voltage or whether they are using dynamic voltage control and frequency stepping (i.e. power saving features).

 

100% agree, in fact when I overclock I do not go for the highest push. I never up voltage and always leave on power savings features. By doing this my overclock is truly free since it is likely I will do zero damage.

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