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How does a water-cooler work?


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#1 TCcomputers29

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 09:05 PM

I was just wondering how a water cooler or pump work and how does it cool the CPU? Please explain it to me
Thank you :rolleyes:
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#2 vandreadstriker

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 09:24 PM

I was just wondering how a water cooler or pump work and how does it cool the CPU? Please explain it to me
Thank you :rolleyes:

As far as I know, water would be circulating the whole watercooler setup and when it reaches the CPU block, the heat from the CPU is transfered to the water, then the water goes back to the radiator and is cooled off by the fans there, then goes back to the CPU block again. CMIIIW

Hope it helps :)

Edited by vandreadstriker, 24 May 2011 - 09:24 PM.

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#3 tacohunter52

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 09:24 PM

Water cooling is used because it usually (Depending on the setup) outperforms air cooling. The reason it does is because of water's thermal conductivity (Which is something like 20 times that of air) and its specific heat capacity. You obviously won't get 20 times the performance of an air cooler though. Water has a high heat capacity which means it takes more energy to actually heat up the water. This makes it a good liquid to use in liquid cooled setups.

A liquid cooling setup consists of a radiator, a pump, and a waterblock. (Sometimes a reservoir and waterblocks for other components are included as well).

Heat is transferred from the CPU to the water block. The water block is hollow (Usually finned as well) which allows water to flow through it. As the water flows through it the heat is transferred as well. The water will then flow (Depending on how you set up your loop) through the pump and into the radiator. The water is cooled in the radiator and then flows back to the waterblock.

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#4 TCcomputers29

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 09:28 PM

So, the water goes to the copper base to extract the heat?
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#5 tacohunter52

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 09:33 PM

So, the water goes to the copper base to extract the heat?


I'm not sure what you mean. The water block is hollow and the water flows through it and over the copper part.

Here is a picture of that part of a water block. (No specific one, I just googled waterblock and grabbed the first one I saw)

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#6 TCcomputers29

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 09:48 PM

So the pipe is hollow and the water travels through it and touches the copper base( the one in contact with the CPU)
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#7 Coors

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 09:53 AM

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#8 csimon

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 07:13 AM

Basically, the water contacts the cpu waterbock and heats up all of the water in the loop because it is circulating via pump. As the heated water is also looped through the radiator, the fan which blows through the fins and copper tubing that runs through it, removes the heat by passing ambient air through the radiator. That is it.

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#9 hornybluecow

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 07:24 AM

you pour water on it, the trick is how to keep pouring while using it. :)

no really the only reasons its water because its very heat conductive. if oil was better or peanut butter it would be called PB-Cooler. basically water is in a closed loop so it doesn't touch any components. the copper plate gets warm from the component and water flowing over it takes the heat away. its the same with air coolers but those pipes are closed and full of vapor or oil.

Edited by hornybluecow, 27 May 2011 - 07:30 AM.

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#10 Locutus

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 09:13 AM

I keep my computer at the bottom of my pool. Trust me, it doesn't short out. Since it's 12v it runs just fine.

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#11 Waco

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 10:05 AM

I keep my computer at the bottom of my pool. Trust me, it doesn't short out. Since it's 12v it runs just fine.

I know you're joking but you should probably use some smilies to let everyone know. :lol:

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#12 Guest_Jim_*

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 10:09 AM

I keep my computer at the bottom of my pool. Trust me, it doesn't short out. Since it's 12v it runs just fine.

:whoa:
:lol: You actually can submerge a computer in water to cool it, just like how some people submerge their rigs in oil. The trick is that the water has to be completely clean and deionized and the whole thing has to be sealed. Funny fact about water is it is not a conductor at all, it is an insulator to electricity. However, water is a solvent and the ions in water, from whatever it dissolves, will allow conduction, hence why you need deionized water. Of course I don't know where you can get deionized water, but, in theory, that would be a great cooling system.

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