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Munkypoo7

Cleaning a car hood [noob] ><

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I wouldn't touch my car with any brand of dish soap. If you want to remove the wax then use a light rubbing compound and READ the instructions.

WOAH!

 

No way in hell would I use RUBBING COMPOUND to remove wax. Why the heck would you use something abrasive when Dawn is a proven safe way to remove wax easily???

 

Anywho - you can use regular car soup like you got in-between waxes (or if you are just applying a new coat of wax and don't want to remove the old wax).

Edited by Waco

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Yep - if your finish wasn't scratched before using the rubbing compound - it would be afterwards. Even using just a polishing compound requires a delicate touch to ensure that you don't do more damage than good.

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Yep - if your finish was scratched before using the rubbing compound - it would be afterwards. Even using just a polishing compound requires a delicate touch to ensure that you don't do more damage than good.

Exactly. Polishing compound is already abrasive enough to do a lot of damage to your paint if you aren't careful...

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Still looking forward to an answer as to why a gentle solution of hand dish washing soap and warm water is such a bad idea.........................

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Still looking forward to an answer as to why a gentle solution of hand dish washing soap and warm water is such a bad idea.........................

I don't think you'll find one that makes sense. :P There's nothing wrong with that practice.

Edited by Waco

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I don't think you'll find one that makes sense. :P There's nothing wrong with that practice.

 

What I've heard.. and this is from companies who are trying to sell you their own washing product.... so... but yeah, it's that it eats away at the top coat of paint over time. I just got back from AdvanceAutoParts and ironically that's what the clerk told me while I was picking up a spare Deep Crystal Paint Cleaner [since it isn't even on their site anymore, they may not carry it ..and it's magic O.O].

 

Though it is a tangent... I'll ask it anyways, you guys posted that polishing compound was abrasive... I was under the impression it wasn't abrasive, that it was used to clean up small swirly scratches..? [unless Rubbing compound = polishing compound... but I doubt thats true]

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Rubbing compound has a coarser grit than polishing compound. And even in each class there can be various levels of "coarseness" If that's a word. Just like sandpaper.

 

An example;

 

When you're professionally finishing a painted surface you might start out with 1200 grit 3M sand paper and wet sand > then you would go to maybe 1600 grit or even 2000 grit 3M sand paper and wet sand even more. You keep going up in fineness until you are ready for rubbing out and then polishing. You might have to start out with a fairly course rubbing compound and then progress to some really fine polishing compound.

 

After all of these hours of work you're finally ready for the final wash and clean of the surface and prep for a coat of finishing wax. Hope that makes sense. This is the process that gives show cars that "mile" deep finish look.

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Rubbing compound has a coarser grit than polishing compound. And even in each class there can be various levels of "coarseness" If that's a word. Just like sandpaper.

 

An example;

 

When you're professionally finishing a painted surface you might start out with 1200 grit 3M sand paper and wet sand > then you would go to maybe 1600 grit or even 2000 grit 3M sand paper and wet sand even more. You keep going up in fineness until you are ready for rubbing out and then polishing. You might have to start out with a fairly course rubbing compound and then progress to some really fine polishing compound.

 

After all of these hours of work you're finally ready for the final wash and clean of the surface and prep for a coat of finishing wax. Hope that makes sense. This is the process that gives show cars that "mile" deep finish look.

 

Aha! Perfect, completely understood. :D

 

Thanks ^^

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First, what is the point of removing the wax? You won't be doing anything but stripping the clear coat of it's protection. All you need to do is use a clay bar on that area thoroughly, and then use a cleaner wax after that. All should be fine. If it isn't, then you take it to a professional and let him detail the entire car.

 

When it comes to cars, there is a bit you can do on your own. But most paints and cars nowadays are so sophisticated if you do something wrong you could ruin it all. Why take the chance of needing to get the hood repainted?

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I owned a detail shop long enough to find that Autoglym products are the best you can get when it comes to exterior surfaces. What you are describing sounds as though it may be shipping wax residue. Cars are sprayed with a special wax when they are sent via rail or truck. When they arrive at their destination the car dealership uses a special wax breaker to remove it. When I had my shop I had a different breaker for each manufacturer. Any wax-removing soap may do the trick though.

 

As for wax, (wax and polish are different beasts, I will explain later,) the BEST I've ever used was Autoglym super radiant wax. This stuff smells good enough to eat too! It is a cream based wax that will remove stains, swirls, dirt, other wax ect. all in one. It also leaves an incredible shine and is very easy to work with. As with any creme based wax mist the surface with water before you begin.

 

Polish has abrasives in it. Commercial polish has grit ratings just like sandpaper. It smooths out paint imperfections by actualy removing and replacing paint material at the same time. You need to be very careful with polish, if you don't know what you are doing you can burn your paint or strip it right off. Polish MUST be used with a wet surface!

 

You can also polish with a creme wax. In this case you use a different pad for different apps. ie soft pad for applying wax to a good surface, or a coarser pad for damaged or oxidized surface.

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First, what is the point of removing the wax? You won't be doing anything but stripping the clear coat of it's protection. All you need to do is use a clay bar on that area thoroughly, and then use a cleaner wax after that. All should be fine. If it isn't, then you take it to a professional and let him detail the entire car.

 

When it comes to cars, there is a bit you can do on your own. But most paints and cars nowadays are so sophisticated if you do something wrong you could ruin it all. Why take the chance of needing to get the hood repainted?

:unsure: It's pretty hard to actually damage the paint with standard dish soap. :lol: As long as you wax it afterwards there's literally nothing you can do to hurt the paint.

 

What do you think the professionals do that you can't do on your own time?

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What do you think the professionals do that you can't do on your own time?

 

Well I know that when I clean my car it doesn't cost me more than $1 per wash.

 

People are too obsessed with how their cars look IMHO.

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