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Chip Temp and Voltage adjustment


The Smith
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Hi guys,

 

Yesterday, I bought a new Zalman CPU heatsink. I installed it and everything works. It keeps my CPU temp below 60C at 3.66 Ghz

 

I first overclocked my E6750 from 2.66 Ghz to 3.44 Ghz, stock voltages, and everything is fine except one thing... The temp of my chip Intel P35 on my Gygabyte P35-DS3R is a bit high... Speed fan and Everest both indicates Temps of 37C but when I put a yougourt thermometer on its heatsink, I get 45C.

 

I tried to raise to 3.66 Ghz, but it needs more voltage to boot. When I configure the voltage on AUTO, I can get into windows and everything is fine, but my chip temp becomes incredibly high. My yougourt thermometer indicates 50C, but I can't even touch its heatsink, it's too HOT !!!

 

 

1st: Why does my P35 chip becomes so hot ?

 

2nd: Should I trust SpeedFan and Everest, considering my thermometer measures ? (I think no...)

 

3rd: Is there a way to prevent the chip's temp raise too high ?

 

 

The Smith

Edited by The Smith

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Cheesewiz6,

 

This is technically impossible.

 

You must know that the heat will always transfer from the hottest point to where it is colder, in order to achieve an equilibrium. This means it will always try to get all the pieces at the same temperature.

 

If the heat is produced BY the chip, it will transfer TO the heatsink and then, TO the surrounding air, because the air is colder than the heatsink, which is colder than the chip.

 

If we got the inverse(The heatsink is hotter than the chip), as you say, the heat will go FROM the heatsink TO the chip, which is not what we want !

 

Another thing you must know. There is a law in physics and chemistry that says: NOTHING IS CREATED, NOTHING IS LOST.(Stated by the great chemist Lavoisier in the 18th century) In other words, you can't heat something hotter than you by giving off your heat.

 

This means if you have very hot heatsinks you should worry about it, because it means that the chip under it is even hotter.

 

I don't want to insult you, but please be sure about what you say, next time...

 

The Smith

Edited by The Smith

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a small fan would definitely help your temps, since I see that you have already lapped the northbridge heatsink and put AS5. another choice would be to get an aftermarket northbridge heatsink like the Thermalright HR-05

Edited by mr._blue_sky

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Yeah,

 

I installed a small fan and it works very well. The heatsink is now much cooler !

 

I plugged it in the Sys_Fan1 and I don't know why, but it runs at 3000 rpm instead of 6000 rpm in the Pwr_Fan. These are both 12 V plugs. But it is ok like this, because at 6000 rpm, it makes A LOT of noise...

 

But why does the northbridge becomes a lot hotter when I OC my FSB ? How does this affect it?

 

Here's a pic...

 

The Smith

Edited by The Smith

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Yeah,

 

But why does the northbridge becomes a lot hotter when I OC my FSB ? How does this affect it?

 

Here's a pic...

 

The Smith

As far as I know, this is because the northbridge is in charge of the chip. When you overclock the chip, and thus raise the vcore, the northbridge voltage is usually raised as well(many times automatically by the bios, or by the user). This taxes the northbridge a bit more, and.it gets hotter(probably has something to do with electrical resistance or something like that).

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Ok, so the nb has to follow the chip's voltage...

 

If I set it manually, could it result in an unstable machine or a non-post if the nb voltage isn't high enough ?

voltage set too low will cause instability since you are not giving it enough power to handle the new strain on it due to the overclock. setting it manually will not cause instability if you set it at the correct voltage. To get the correct voltage that you need, you will have to do a little bit of testing(raising it one increment at a time, different motherboards have different increments) to see what is the best voltage that will give you a stable system, but won't overheat your chipset. I cannot give you any specific voltages to use since I use a different board, and I have mine set to auto(stays about 9C above ambient temp)

Edited by mr._blue_sky

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