Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Xerxes

Nf4 Ultra-D power issues with seasonic

Recommended Posts

430W? I thought that the minimum for a DFI (NF4) board was 480W. You should have tried the 500W version.

The recommendation is meaningless.

 

1) It does not take into account the power distribution.

2) It does not take into account sustained vs. peak ratings.

3) It does not take into account the PSU efficiency.

4) It is way too high for most users.

 

See article.

 

Basically, DFI covered their collective behinds by choosing a number that should be safe when you select from the crappiest PSUs on the market.

 

If you disagree, you are welcome to prove me wrong by measuring a higher than 400W draw from a non-SLI system that could use a DFI board (8-way SMP Xeons do not count). Hell, I'd be surprised if you could draw 300W.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
430W? I thought that the minimum for a DFI (NF4) board was 480W. You should have tried the 500W version.

That is why I said in my post:

(yea, I know it was under the recommended wattage)

I also couldn't believe that a solid 430 PSU would be unable to get a board into the BIOS with only a CPU, CPU fan, and 1 stick of 512 RAM. However I was proven wrong, and the Enermax 565 worked fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I've said this before, but it isn't necessarily about power draw, but about power stability. I think that DFI are recommending 480W+ PSUs precisely because the way specifications are marketed to consumers is not uniform across the board (related to what you said). Though have you tried running a DFI NF4 motherboard with a PSU below 480W (even a quality one) under circumstances like SLI gaming?

 

Probably the 'A list' is a better approach, but it is limited because it is impossible for DFI (well the people at DFI Street) to have tested every single type of PSU with a DFI motherboard, even while they might try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The recommendation is meaningless.

 

If you disagree, you are welcome to prove me wrong by measuring a higher than 400W draw from a non-SLI system that could use a DFI board (8-way SMP Xeons do not count). Hell, I'd be surprised if you could draw 300W.

 

I have a UPS and it gives a reading of power. Right now I have a Intel Dual core 3 Ghz with 1gig RAM, one WD 740 Raptor, one Geforce 6800, this is non-SLI system. My monitor draws about 30W. Without monitor my computer draws 140 W at idle, 250 W when playing Guild Wars (that's when the graphic card is stressed and CPU is semi stressed), and 270 W when running Mersenne prime small FFT. If I make two instances and assign one to each core, power goes up to 280 W, and that's when my graphic card is at idle! So Pentium dual core is a really power hungry device. My 6800 regular draws about 30-40W at full load, and Geforce 7800 GTX draws about 80W I believe. So if you run a game that stress both the GPU and CPU, that's 280+80*2 = 440 W, and you want to leave some room for other things such as if you got two hard drive and other cards in your computer (mine is pretty empty inside). So the 500W figure of whatever set by Nvidia is more of science than art.

 

AMD Dual core draws at least 80-100W less than Intel Dual core. But nVidia just didn't want to confuse the hell out of people with two different power ratings for both Intel and AMD computers, and I don't think people at Intel would want to see that either. Ahh.. the beauty of marketing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think I've said this before' date=' but it isn't necessarily about power draw, but about power stability. I think that DFI are recommending 480W+ PSUs precisely because the way specifications are marketed to consumers is not uniform across the board (related to what you said). Though have you tried running a DFI NF4 motherboard with a PSU below 480W (even a quality one) under circumstances like SLI gaming?

QUOTE']

 

Also the power rating for a power supply is for steady state operation, however the instantaneous power might be much higher than that. Your power supply needs to be able to handle the current spikes and current surges, that's when the extra 100-200 or whatever watts are factored in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello neverbehind,

 

I have a UPS and it gives a reading of power.

You do understand that your UPS measures the AC power that the PSU sraws, not the DC power it provides (and what it is rated for), right?

The difference may be as much as 2X under certain conditions (although a good PSU can achieve >80% efficiency).

 

Right now I have a Intel Dual core 3 Ghz with 1gig RAM, one WD 740 Raptor, one Geforce 6800, this is non-SLI system.

Pray tell how you managed to fit a dual core Pentium (socket 775, I presume) onto a DFI nF4 board (socket 939, as DFI does not sell Intel nF4 boards at this time).

 

For the record, Intel says that the Pentium-D 840 dissipates 130W (source)

 

So the 500W figure of whatever set by Nvidia is more of science than art.

Um, no. Your math is suspect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello neverbehind,

You do understand that your UPS measures the AC power that the PSU sraws, not the DC power it provides (and what it is rated for), right?

The difference may be as much as 2X under certain conditions (although a good PSU can achieve >80% efficiency).

 

Pray tell how you managed to fit a dual core Pentium (socket 775, I presume) onto a DFI nF4 board (socket 939, as DFI does not sell Intel nF4 boards at this time).

 

For the record, Intel says that the Pentium-D 840 dissipates 130W (source)

 

Um, no. Your math is suspect.

 

I do understand that, I also understand that you assume my power supply has a low efficiency.

 

It's not a fit issue, I have two computers. One that I am typing this message on, and another one that will be built tonight.

 

I think you mixed up thermal design power and power consumption, please see this article: http://www.silentpcreview.com/article169-page3.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just ordered this PSU with my new system , despite this forum thread.

 

As the seasonic seems to be a dreamy good almost enterprise level PSU, and the problem does seem to be fixed easily with a jumper switch.

Im still undecided whether to cancel my order and change to the noisetaker...

Hmm

 

Decisions decisions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the S12-600 PSU and there seems to be a bit of an issue if the 5 v or 3.3 v line is not loaded well. I have seen this issue with Bios versions 510, 623 and 704 (havent tried others).

 

If I power on the system from a cold boot with 2 Sata +1 IDE HDD +1 IDE DVDRW drive then the system does NOT post. The system power turns on and the fans rev up to full speed (typical startup) and then the system hangs with the fans at full speed even the vdo card does not get initialized.

 

Another thing I notcided is that if I use the above configuration I have to press the power button twice to starttup the system. Pressing the button once causes the DROM led to glow and the second push actually turns on the power.

 

However if I add another IDE drive (HDD,DVD,CD) to the above config then the system boots up normally with a single push on the power button. An idea what might be causing this? My DRAM is a 2.7v and my cpu at 1.705v. All the power connectors on the motherboard are connected

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Seasonic S12-430 works great (I know it is under the recommended wattage).

 

I finished building my system around 2 weeks ago and never had a problem with the power supply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi neverbehind,

I do understand that, I also understand that you assume my power supply has a low efficiency.

I assumed less than 80%

 

It's not a fit issue, I have two computers. One that I am typing this message on, and another one that will be built tonight.

It is. I was talking about the recommendations for the nF4 board. Measuring the power draw of a Pentium-D may be informative but hardly relevant to this board.

 

My point was (and still is) that a high quality, high efficiency 400W PSU which complies with the ATX2.0 spec and has stable rails, should be more than enough for this board in a non-SLI setting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i had to send the S12-600 back to Seasonic. They are sending me 2 replacements to continue testing.

 

 

Did you get them yet? My s12-600 was working fine then it gradually started to get the symptoms that everyone else has ex: push the power button twice to turn it on, amber light next to dram, amber led next to the last pci slot flashes when ac is turned on, now it wont even boot. I just got this Psu should I RMA it or hold out to see if there is a solution?

 

 

Jackson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...