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What's the opposite of a divider?

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Guest scott

I'm an OC noob.

 

You run a divider if your RAM can't overclock as fast as your cpu, right?

 

Well, in my rig I'm pretty sure it's the other way around.

I think the OCZ RAM will go a lot higher than the A64 3200+ cpu.

 

I think so because benchmarks show the cpu stable up to 251 MHz, but any higher and it's unstable.

 

But I can boot into Windows way higher, like 270 - 275 MHz, so the RAM must be ok with that.

 

So, how do you take advantage of the faster RAM speed while holding the cpu down to a speed where it's stable? This is the exact opposite situation of when to use a divider, right?

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You lower the multiplier, and raise the fsb :D Or what? :S...i think you can do it that way...im very new to overclocking so just wait for someone else to respond too =)

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1:1 will be the fastest. Mem speed = FSB. Use your stock multiplier, dont use a divider and see how high your CPU will go.

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Booting to Windows isn't a good test of RAM capability/stability. Use Memtest.

Use the divide and conquer method: find individual ceilings for HTT, CPU and RAM, and then try to do the best you can with all three o/c'd at once.

Check the stickies for more in-depth information.

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Guest scott
Use a lower multiplier on your cpu

 

Are you saying that a lower LDT/FSB frequency ratio will let the RAM clock faster than the cpu? It's at X3 now. Are you saying to tune this down to X2?

 

I'm sure RAM is NOT limiting the OC because lots of guys use the same RAM with higher-level cpu's and post higher speeds than me. One guy (timko) is above 310MHz HTT with this RAM, while I'm stuck at 251MHz HTT right now.

 

Angry Games says to emphasize faster cpu speed. Still, since the RAM clocks faster than the cpu, it seems to make sense to also put that additional RAM speed to work if I can learn how to do it.

 

THunDA posted above that there's no way to use a divider to make RAM run faster than the cpu. Well, is there something that's the OPPOSITE of a divider that will do it? Or does RAM simply not run at a faster clock than the cpu no matter what?

 

Apologies if the answer is obvious to you...it isn't yet clear to me, here in OC learning-land.

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I'm an OC noob.

 

You run a divider if your RAM can't overclock as fast as your cpu, right?

 

Well, in my rig I'm pretty sure it's the other way around.

I think the OCZ RAM will go a lot higher than the A64 3200+ cpu.

 

I think so because benchmarks show the cpu stable up to 251 MHz, but any higher and it's unstable.

 

But I can boot into Windows way higher, like 270 - 275 MHz, so the RAM must be ok with that.

 

So, how do you take advantage of the faster RAM speed while holding the cpu down to a speed where it's stable? This is the exact opposite situation of when to use a divider, right?

 

if u want higher mem freq. then HTT (opposite of a conventional higher HTT then mem freq.), then flash to 702 series. this ALPHA bios supports it. link in sig for bootable iso, download, etc.

 

the an8 ultra (3.55v vdimm max ver.) also supports higher mem. freq then htt (for reference).

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My last system had dividers that would allow higher mem ie: 5:4, I never tried them out but why would you want to have mem running faster then the rest of your system? It's estimated that 90% of information that a cpu needs is stored in it's cache. Running your fsb lower effects your drives and communication between cpu and video card.

 

I'm not sure what effect higher ram would have, perhaps more responsive mem? I do know that higher fsb then ram is known to work very well

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You can crank up your htt pretty much as high as you want .. with 1:1 divider what you set your htt to is what your membus speed will be.

 

Your cpu clock speed is determined by a htt multiplier - say 200 * 12 = 2.4gig (say this is stock). In non-fx processors this multiplier is locked at 12 - can't go up, but can be lowered.

 

So let's say your fsb can be set to 300 with no problems, so if you set your htt multipler to 8 with htt=300 you would still have a 2.4g cpu clock, but a full 300mhz membus.

 

So if you want to hit 2.7g run that 300htt with a 9 multiplier - no divider needed.

 

The only time you really want to use a divider is if you have to crank up your htt higher than your membus can actually do because your multipler that you need/want is above the multipler lock.

 

edit, oops, hit return too soon:

 

like say your memory will only run at 210 htt and you really want that 13 multiplier (for 2730) - this is where you want/need to crank your htt way higher, use the multipler to get your cpu clock, then use the divider to bring your mem buss back close to 210

 

There is a calculator program to help you with this, as the divider does not work exactly as one might expect (divide result is truncated to an integer, and next higher integer is used .. long story)

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My last system had dividers that would allow higher mem ie: 5:4, I never tried them out but why would you want to have mem running faster then the rest of your system? It's estimated that 90% of information that a cpu needs is stored in it's cache. Running your fsb lower effects your drives and communication between cpu and video card.

 

I'm not sure what effect higher ram would have, perhaps more responsive mem? I do know that higher fsb then ram is known to work very well

 

his cpu limits him, so therefore his throughput is limited by max htt allowed. by cranking the memory higher then the HTT, he gets the added throughput, but keeps his max CPU MHZ. this way he can max out his ram mhz/throughput as well as his max cpu mhz.

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