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Kamel

does the fortron blue storm hold up to the name?

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title says it all basically, i just wanted to know if this psu held up to the quality standard set by the fortron 530watt. i was noticing it had dual rails, which is quite nice, and i was wanting to know if it had voltage pots in it as well.

[url="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16817104934"]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?...N82E16817104934[/url]

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AG and I both pre-purchased the CAX500 FSP BLUE STORM before the DFI NF4's came to us because we needed the native 24 pin and I looked around and saw that supply and we got them early. I modded my 3.3Volt rail with cermet resistor for more 3.3Volts and since then have done nothing but use it. It was a really good price point.

Now however I might go for the Enermax 535 watt supply as it is about or was about $83 dollars at zipzoomfly and is maybe a little heavier power supply. Don't know if 'any' of that supply has adjustable rails though but it is a good supply if you do not ever intend to mod the 3.3Volt rail since I have not tried that supply.

I see no way to go wrong with either supply at a reasonable loading of the power supply.

RGone...

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lol, nice.

RGone: FYI i found a review that said that the blue storm series does have voltage pots just like the forton 530watt did. also the 500watt model has passive fluxation control built in... apparently this can make fairly unstable voltages from the mains regulated so that it does not interrupt the ability of the psu to supply your computer. active fluxuation control is better, which can completely comptensate from sags and spikes like a surge protector would is better, but pfc is nice.

well, that's what i've ready anyway, i've yet to see what it actually does or how it might be a benefit to me, heh.

edit: thanks for the info rgone btw, i'm glad it is good, because i got impatient and ordered it yesterday lol.

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the 3.3v line isn't potted so like rgone says you have to pot it yourself.

ive been ultra satisfied with mine. its quiet, it has enough power, and it is pre-sleeved.

id purchase another one again in an instant.

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could you guys put up a link to show how one would "pot" the 3.3 volt line. Cause I have no f---ing idea what you guys are talking about lol. Also I wanna see the degree of difficulty for this mod tx

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[quote name='Angry_Games']the 3.3v line isn't potted so like rgone says you have to pot it yourself.

ive been ultra satisfied with mine. its quiet, it has enough power, and it is pre-sleeved.

id purchase another one again in an instant.[/quote]

oh, i didn't catch that, tnx.

would that be like a sense line modding thing where you put a pot on the sense line?

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potting in electronics terms means to add a potentiometer. we say pot for short... what a pot does is changes its ohms of resistance by turning it. sometimes they are called variable resisters, or VR's for short. if say you've got a 100K 28 turn pot, then the initial resistance is going to be 100K, then with each turn it will decrease by about 4K ohms, until finally it's free flowing with no resistance.

the first thing you should learn is that in electronics, resistance is a beatiful thing. for some reason the name tends to leave a negitive connotation on many people, but resistance has a ton to do with how we can regulate voltage and amps and so on. basically what a pot does in a power supply unit is it increases the resistance on the rail from the sense line, reading out less volts, in turn fooling your PSU into thinking it needs to give more volts for an even current. once it adds the volts appropriately, you have successfully modified the output of your PSU, giving you the ability to fine-tune the voltages in your PSU.

the fortron PSU's have been known for this, and when you open them up, there are 4 pots inside for each rail (except for the 3.3v rail with the blue storm as ag says). as for what it looks like, visit [url="http://www.insanetek.com/index.php?page=fortron400bs"]http://www.insanetek.com/index.php?page=fortron400bs[/url] and look at the bottom row of pictures, the three on the right are exaggerating the pots inside the psu. in order to adjust them, jump your power supply (i wouldn't ever suggest doing it with your PSU connected to your precious DFI mobo) and get a digital multimeter, then slowly turn the pots and give the PSU a minute to adjust to the change.

that's about it, heh. pots 101 :)

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There was a great thread on doing the v-sense mod at XS,but now the pics are gone :tooth: ,I should have copied the whole dang thing, :sad:
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=37574"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=37574[/url]

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The Fortron Blue Storm 500W is highly recommended for non-SLI systems &
is available for $72 with free shipping.

The Enermax 535W SLI Ready ($83 + S&H)) &
the Antec True Power II 550W SLI Certified ($89 + S&H) are recommended for SLI rigs.

Links in PSU Guide. ;)

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