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I got Kingston HyperX 3200, might be CH-5.

I'm trying to overclock it, and I might need to pump up some voltage.

How do you guys cool the momory? I heard, if I plan to give more than 3V then I need to apply some active cooling.

 

I'm trying to add 80mm fan on it, but I couldn't really find out the place attaching the Fan.

Any comments would be appreciated.

Thanks.

:D

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I believe that your ram is rated at 2.6v.?

 

Some ram love an increase in voltage, whereas some don't. I doubt that you can go all the way up to 3.2v, but there is only one real way to find out. I wouldn't think you would be stable much over 2.9v, but I'm no expert so I can't say for sure. You may not have to go that high to get the results you are looking for.

 

Install 1 stick for testing, and just inch up the volts and see what happens. You will be able to tell when you are at your limit. Of course, worst case scenerio you could fry your ram.:eek: But, more than likely, if you go too far you will get artifacts, bsod, or won't be able to post. Personally, I'd just go with a good set of heatspreaders and take it slow and easy when upping the voltages.

 

Maybe someone with more memory overclocking experience can help out on this one.

 

 

 

DS

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Yea the best way is to get a fan blowing air on it.. when I was using my bh5 I hot glued a fan to the duct on my cpu so it blew on my ram.. :)

 

You can try to up the voltage and run memtest #5.. then feel the ram and if its hot to the touch you need to cool it.. but of course even if its not too hot cooling definitly wont harm it anyway..

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Guest culinist

The ATX power cable usually makes an ok spot to attach a fan. I used some zip ties and just hung a fan from it. Kinda ghetto but it works.:)

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Originally posted by culinist

Kinda ghetto but it works.:)

 

Test your metal working skills with a piece of one inch wide thin aluminum from HomeDepot. To make sure you get a piece thick enough to bend but not be too flexible, you should hold it in your hand with about six inches sticking out, apply pressure to the free end and it should not bend against your hand. You can make nice bends using the edge of a table and a block of wood to hold it down. It may help to have another set of hands to make the bends. Get a piece about twice as long as you need. Use the middle of the piece to make your bends then cut off the extra. This will make it easier to control while making the bends.

 

I made a template from cardboard cereal box using a drive bracket as the mounting point. Once I had everything the way I liked it I transfered my marks to the aluminum and started bending.

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