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Dram Ratio?


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ok plain and simple what is dram ratio and what does it do? also im wondering what is considered agressive timing for ram cas? i was gonna clock my 3.0c 800 fsb to 3.5. the mulitplier is 15 and im gonna push the fsb to 233. was wondering if i should mess with the dram ratio at all (currently set @ 1:1). also what is PSB? im a total newb with this ocing stuff and i dont want to screw anything up. memory im running is 2x 256mb mushkin 3500 (cas 2.5).

 

 

so here are the important system specs

 

Intel P4 3.0ghz 800 fsb @ OC 1.75v core Mult 15 x 233 bus = 3.495

Abit IC-7 (non "g" ver)

Mushkin 512 (2x256) DDR433 @ OC 2.75v dimm cas 2-2-2-7 (<-- should cas be higher or lower to be stable)

Koolance EXOS watercooler w/ gold cpu block from koolance

 

OK these are the specs that I WANT. CURRENTLY SYSTEM IS STOCK. UNTOUCHED. just checking with you guys to see if this is ok to push my system and also if something does go wrong would it go horribly wrong or would the mobo and cpu shut itself off?

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nice setup. you must get that system to 3.800 , with the right cooling, and knowledge(we ll help you with the last one :P )

 

how to

 

make shure you have good cooling. (what cooling do you have?)

increase in small parts( fsb and voltage)

when system gets unstable due to highering fsb, higher voltages--> more heat.

 

let us know when you have more questions

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thanks for the feedback guys but ehhh... did anyone read the questions or are you guys just gonna comment. i need some help ocing this thing. you can consider it a group project. YAY! ok so go back to the top and read my original questions and help a guy out.

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Well if you had gone to the link that DimensioN posted you would have seen this which might help you out some.

Can memory (SDRAM/DDR) be Overclocked?

Yes. As when Overclocking the CPU, enter the BIOS and look for the memory settings - if you cannot find it, take a look at your motherboard

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the 1:1 ratio means if your FSB is at 200 Mhz your DDR frequency will be at 200MHz as well which is fine how you have it. And your CAS settings are good where they are so you are all set to go.

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heres your answer joe:

 

the memory bus can be set in relation to the clock speed. so if you had a memory ratio of 1:2, the memory bus would run half as fast as the system clock, likewise, 2:1 the memory bus would run twice as fast as the system clock. for best performance, you want to put them in sync, which means that the memory bus and the cpu clock are the same (also known as 100% or 1:1 ratio). i would suggest that you set your memory timings to 2-2-2-5, leave the memory ratio at 1:1, set your multiplyer low (to ensure any instablility is caused by the ram being at its limit and not the cpu) then do your overclocking via FSB as far as you can get it. this will let you find how fast your ram will be able to go (since as you increase the fsb, the memory will increase since it is 1:1). once your ram is at its limit, increase the core volts until you reach your desired temps, then increase the multiplyer until system becomes untsable

 

thats the method for overclocking with high performance ram, its kinda complicated, but feel free to ask questions ;)

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thank you very much mercury. when u mean unstable, do u mean that the system starts to falter, as in crash? also i am not able to set my multiplier low on my pentium it is locked at 15. is there any way to unlock it? and one more question, if im just gonna overclock with fsb do i need to up the core voltage too or just only the memory?

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Unstable= PC crashing, not booting, games freeze etc.

You can't unlock a Pentium chip. Intel doesn't like overclockers.

 

If you get to the point where the chip is unstable, up the vCore a little bit to make it stable.

 

-Moderator at Neb's Forums. Please check the forums out and sign up when your there.

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put the vcore up until it either tops out in the mobo, or it causes to high of a temperature in the CPU. basically what your doing is trying to set anything you can to allow for a good comparison of dependant variables. you know that in order to get the highest fsb possible, you need the highest voltage possible without going over heat or mobo limits. therefore, figure out this setting then just oc the fsb until it becomes unstable...

 

there are 3 levels of stability:

 

POST: if your computer can post, your past the first test of stability, if it doesnt post, you have to reset the bios via the cmos battery

STARTUP: this is when windows is loading, often if unstable, you will get blue screens and freezes here.

APPLICATION: this is when you run 3dmark03 or the highest intensity program you have for about 10 minutes to make sure it can be stable in any other applications you run

 

the hardest part is finding the fsb speed where instability occurs, once you find that, you can lower the fsb to JUST lower than that, and you will have the max possible overclock... so here are your complete list of steps

 

 

1. set your memory timings to 2-2-2-5

2. change the memory ratio to 1:1/100%/sync

3. turn down multiplyer to lowest possible setting (if multiplyer is not unlocked, unlock it or skip this step)

4. increase your dimm voltage to ammount that you think your memory cooling can handle

5. increase your vcore until it tops out in mobo or your temperatures become too high (change it up one step, boot, check cpu temp for idle, load any 100% cpu program, check temp for load. if temps are good, restart, up voltage one more step and repeat) once you reach a vcore that causes too much heat, reboot and lower it to the one step lower

6. increase the FSB by 1mhz, boot and run any 100% cpu program for 10 minutes, if no instability occurs, reboot, up fsb by 1mhz, repeat until instability of any kind occurs, when this happens, reboot, lower fsb 1mhz.

7. **do only if you did step 3** increase multiplyer in same mehtod as step 6, until instability occurs, in which case you will lower the multiplyer one step. if you reach bios limit, then leave it

 

that is the proper steps to reach the highest atainable speeds possible... once you have fsb, multiplyer, dimm volt, and vcore set, leave them alone (trust me, they are at the highest they can be, this is assured if you follow the steps properly). if you wish to OC your video card, increase the agp voltage until it reaches the point where you think the agp cooling can no longer sustain, then go into the bios, increase agp bus by 1 mhz, following the proper stability testing said above, until instability occurs, then lower fsb by 1 mhz

 

your system is now overclocked! ;)

Edited by Mercury

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