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Os X Tiger X86


romeo55
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A friend of mine is looking to install OS X Tiger on his PC (Dell, P4 w/ sse3 (recent 3.2)) Although, first question.

 

 

Where can he buy it? Is it even buy able yet?

Apparently, he thinks that it's only available for 64bit cpus, is it true? (P4 listed above is 32bit)

 

Yes, he had sse3, so he should be good on that part :)

 

Thanks :)

 

BTW: the other option is just telling him to drop $1k on a mac book :(

Edited by The Unforgivin

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release is slated for right after vista for a retail version.

 

it's also EXTREMLY buggy about sound and video setups as of right now. anything creative labs is out of the question (legal reasons). though linux drivers for the 7950GX2 do work with some farting around.

 

I had to install it with an X300 in one slot, load the drivers for the first 7950GX2 in the 2nd slot, then setup SLI and finally install the 2nd 7950GX2

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release is slated for right after vista for a retail version.

 

it's also EXTREMLY buggy about sound and video setups as of right now. anything creative labs is out of the question (legal reasons). though linux drivers for the 7950GX2 do work with some farting around.

 

I had to install it with an X300 in one slot, load the drivers for the first 7950GX2 in the 2nd slot, then setup SLI and finally install the 2nd 7950GX2

 

meh, i told him and he just went with buying a mac. Says it causes too many headaches :(

 

thanks guys :)

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  • 2 months later...

Though this is an old thread, the question is still valid.

 

Yes, Boot Camp is essentially just software that creates a partition to install Windows on and creates a disc of drivers for your Mac that you install in Windows. When the computer starts, you hold a key and a screen loads asking you to pick which partition to load from.

 

Though honestly, if you're using Windows more for casual use than say gaming or other hardware intensive applications, then I would suggest going with Parallels as you can then have the two operating systems running side by side. Much better than having to reboot just to load one or two programs. Now that they have Coherence mode, it's even easier to run since Windows essentially runs like a background process where you can load Windows programs and use them side-by-side with Mac OS X programs. Check out their website for a demonstration, it's pretty neat.

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well i only use windows for gaming and msn messnger as there are not many games on mac. but mac would push and use my hardwear more when using photoshop and other such like apps . maybe make the most out of my e6600. but a friend just told me mac only uses IDE is that right?

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I have a SATA drive in my Macbook right now, so I would have to say no, Mac does not just use IDE. In fact, Macs are just regular PCs now but with a modified motherboard and a different OS. That's why Windows will run natively on a Mac.

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