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Wavemaster Case Mod


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The PC is up and running (getting OC'd at the moment) but I'm a little behind on the pics. I have some ready to go now and will try to have the rest later today but it may run into tomorrow.

 

The Swiftech resevoir that I am using is very small and the fill port at the top is just plain tiny.....so I bought one of those DangerDen fill ports that mount in the top of the case and figured I could run a tube down to the top of the resevoir. Yea.....Great Idea......I forgot that there is no room left in the top of the case to install a fill port <_< The only thing I could do was mount it outside the case behind the bay door and then cut a hole through one of the bay covers to run the fill tube back into the case but at least I can fill it and top it off when needed without taking it all apart.

 

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Nothing is sacred in my book...so for the sake of better airflow, the need for a place to mount a pump, wire management and the number of optical/hard drives being installed both sides of the drive bays were unriveted and whacked up good in my mill. Not even the drive bay covers are going to escape unscathed :lol:

 

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The old fan mounts were tossed in favor of one that would seal the case better (I always install case filters, having to always clean out dust bunnies is just a pain in the a**)

 

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I think I removed every rivet in this case at least once if not more. The power supply cage had to be removed and modified to fit the PSU. The tabs in the bottom had to go and some material had to be removed from the front for the wires to fit through.

 

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Normally I void the warranty on my power supplies almost immediatly.....I've never had a problem going in there whacking off wires and putting them back the way I want them but when they start getting up into that $170 (including freight) range....it's time to reconsider that practice. I thought about this one a long time and decided I better keep the warranty intact until I knew everything was going to work. So I'm going to have to do the hide the wire thing. Jeeez look at this monster it's like trying to tame a giant squid :blink:

 

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Mounting the pump was pretty easy after all the cutting and hacking I did earlier. I just used a piece of 1/2" plexi and made a plate to mount the pump and installed it in the hard drive bay

 

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Gotta run....more in a little bit B:)

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it's very hard to distinguish the added/modded parts from what looks to be original... that would be a compliment in case you were wondering ;)

 

i'm a bit surprised to see you left the rear single 80mm fan as it is, but i guess with the cpu and both gpu's cooled by water, there's not going to be a whole lot of heat in the case anyway...

 

i don't know why, but i think the fillport is my favourite part so far, it's just so neat and unique... i wish i had fill and drain ports on my rig...

 

coming along nicely... wondering what you're going to end up doing with the front bezel/door and side panels (and windows?) :D

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Here's some more.

 

You almost have to have a fan bus of some sort with a water cooled rig but there are very few (if any) that will fit behind the door on a WaveMaster case. My fan bus of choice has always been the Zalman ZM-MFC1.

It has four fan speed controls with led indicators that have a high enough wattage rating to handle two fans each. It also has two threeway switches 12v/off/5v which come in handy for handling lights and in this case a pump that seems to work pretty good even at 5v as long as the cpu/gpu load isn't over 50% or there abouts. I decided early on to mount it inside the case where you could see in through the side window. Once everything is set to where you want it there isn't really much reason to have to have easy access to the fanbus (and pulling out 2 thumbscrews to get to it isn't THAT hard). This was also an area that I gave a lot of thought to because I saw an opportunity to have the area behind the fanbus become a hiding place for all those freaking wires that I wasn't going to be using. I used one of the spare drive bay covers and made a top plate from acrylic (I never had to work so hard and make so many wierd cuts to get something to fit before...that little plate was a major pain) I don't have the fans or lights wired in yet but you can still get the idea.

 

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I mounted the resevoir on the side of the hard drive bay

 

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You don't have to be a rocket scientist to figure out why this case doesn't cool very well.....just look at the size of the air intake holes! and those are the ONLY air intake in the entire case. I made them a little bigger.....you know ...like about 4 times as big :lol: but that still won't be enough for those Panaflo's in the top of the case.

 

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The Wave Master case ships with an optional fanmount/grill w/filter thet you can use to replace the input port assy in the top of the case (in other words you can put in a blowhole but give up your ports). I already have a PSU sucking air out of the case and 120x2 panaflo's so the last thing I needed was another fan trying to pull air out of the case. I attached the fanmount/grill thingy to the rear exhaust fan and turned it around so that it blows air into the case. It was also nice of ASUS to provide a fan for the mobo if you are going to watercool the cpu!

 

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Here's a pic of the Swiftech CPU & GPU water blocks....I polished them up a bit before they were installed.

 

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The CPU and GPU water blocks installed. I want you to pay particular attention to the copper memory cooling heatsinks that ship as a set with the GPU water blocks. See the two that are cut down under each of the water blocks for clearance?....they don't come that way :angry2: ....you have to cut them down yourself and it's HARD because the pins keep bending. The other thing I want you to notice is that I couldn't even get these things to stick to the memory long enough to take a picture....two minutes after I took this picture they had all fallen off!!! I couldn't get these things to stick to save my a** and I tried everything including a heatgun to try and cook them on!!!! In a fit of rage I peeled the adheasive off of them, cleaned them up with alcohol, broke out a fresh batch of JB WELD, mixed the two components together, spread a p*ss thin layer onto each heatsink and permanently epoxyed those little sob's to the memory chips. (of course after my little fit I thought....well...that was insanely stupid....but as it turns out.... it works good....I mean really really good)

 

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Like I said earlier the PC is basically finished. The only thing I have left to do (to finish the case) is make the side panel, which has been taking awhile because I can't decide exactly how I want to do it. I should have it done in a day or so though.

 

In the meantime here's some pic's of the complete case so far, sorry some of the pic's aren't that clear.

 

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I'll finish up in a day or so B:)

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looking sweet Fueler! B:) i can't get over how fast you work lol...

 

i know what you mean about the ramsinks... you'd think some of the companies would make a version of the ramsinks with 2 out of the 8 being low-profile to fit under the gpu block's barbs/tubing... but no, lol, obviously no one has any sense!

 

i had to mess about in much the same way: http://benchaddix.invisionzone.com/index.p...post&p=8283

 

next time you do ramsinks, you might want to try a drop of superglue at each corner of the ram module, then a small blob of AS5 at the centre, spread it out a touch, but not mixing with the superglue, then press the ramsink down for 30 seconds... holds it on there nice and solid and works really well at cooling, but the difference is you CAN remove the ramsinks with a bit of force, unlike epoxy where the risk of ripping of the ramsinks is a lot higher...

 

see, i had to move the low-profile ramsinks over to another pair when i realised the interlink between the gpu blocks had to be a 270

Edited by hardnrg

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you'd think some of the companies would make a version of the ramsinks with 2 out of the 8 being low-profile to fit under the gpu block's barbs/tubing... but no, lol, obviously no one has any sense!

 

Yeah I know what you mean....makes you wonder if any of these guys have actually installed one of their own GPU blocks :glare:

 

 

unlike epoxy where the risk of ripping of the ramsinks is a lot higher...

 

Are you kidding?....risk h*ll, it would rip the chip in half or clean off the board :lol:

 

 

see, i had to move the low-profile ramsinks over to another pair when i realised the interlink between the gpu blocks had to be a 270

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