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Slr Camera


henbenley
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I now have 5 reasons to go out and buy that camera right now.

 

How do you organize your pictures? Cause mine have gotten so messy that I've lost some of them and cant find them on my computer anymore. I tried by date but then I forget what day I took them and then I find them months later.

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every 100 photos, the canon camera makes a new folder on the CF card. the software that comes with the camera can transfer with dates and stuff, but i generally organise by category: landscape, animals, people etc etc with sub categories and so on.

 

otherwise, no organising at all. i tend to organise once a year, if that....

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I personally use a folder called 'Process' into which I dump all the photos I take. I then go through this folder and sort the pictures into folders based on occasion/subject matter etc. Any sub standard pics get deleted.

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I'm selling all my stuff for this camera (look at my for sale thread and buy something to help me out). Monday I'll be going to SamAsh and hopefully they'll buy my old trumpet from me and hopefully I'll get a decent amount for it. Then if I can find anything else to sell, I'm selling it.

 

Hopefully I'll have this sucker by the end of the summer.

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something to look at.

what film speed=what megapixel.

 

tests recently put the 16mp canon at slightly better than 200 speed 35mm film. so therefore to have an 8x10 with the same clarity and detail of a 35mm enlargement.....youll need a 16mp camera. heres one of mine with a full manual 1966 Nikon Ft (legendary for being bulletproof!)

35mm B&W 200 film -this one took probably 1 week to find out how i did. processing/developing and finishing off the roll. you have no idea what to change unless you write down what settings you had and keep records of every shot.

 

dont even get me started on the 120mm emdium format comparison.....but to say the least that medium format is taking a huge hit in popularity is an understatement. only 1.5 years ago my Mamiya medium format set would have gotten $1k but im struggling to find a buyer at $650

 

now the digital arena is completely different cuase now digital cameras do all kinds of automatic light metering that id never be able to figure out on my own. take a look at this pic i took at work with a 3.5 MP pocket camera. just so tiny and automatic enough to make you really fell like you dont know what youre doing but somehow it turns out in the end.

london%20fog_small.JPG

-with this camera i knew what to change the moment i took the picture and could adjust on the spot and do it again. i learned more in 15 minutes with my uncles 8mp canon 20D than i would have in 6 weeks of film development and note taking. thats a HUGE learning curve thats more than worth it for buying the camera.

 

BENEFITS OF DIGITAL:

-digital will save you $10+ per roll of film if you let someone else develop it...($5-$8 a roll to buy it, and $5 to get it developed into just one set of small prints) unless you develop it yourself theres the time in the darkroom developing it and making prints youll save + cost of chemicals and materials. or if you let someone else do it. so in the long run of money, the digital is a good way to go.

-the learning curve stated above.

-awesome for sports photography!!

 

BENEFITS OF MANUAL:

-moisture wont wreck your $500+ SLR body.

-you can drop it and still shoot.

-cheap to acquire.

-if youre going full manual, the lenses are very cheap in comparison.

-WAY higher resolution then a digital

-great for more steady shots where you dont need rapid fire photography.

 

theres nothing wrong with picking up a cheap used but solid manual film SLR for $250+ (body+2-3 lenses for that!) and then after you know what you need, go digital a year or two later...and then youll still have a film cam. for the composition still life.

 

sports/news/action photographers use digital. still life and the really good portrature guys use film...(120mm medium format still rules the resolution...were talkin 50+MP's here...but dont go that route...its a money pit fo ra beginner)

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I still actually feel more comfortable taking pictures with my old Canon AE-1,

which pretty much fully manual (no autofocus or anything like that). I supose its because I have had it for a while and know it pretty well.

I still don't feel I have taken anything comparably good with my digital yet (Canon A75). Then again, my digital isn't really a serious camera.

 

In the long run I think its beneficial to have both, you will learn quickly with a good digital, which if you have a film camera as well should translate across relatively well.

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hmm i disagree on some points there :lol:

 

the canon EOS-D bodies all use ANY of the existing canon EF lenses. that, and you can flick a switch to turn off the AF and go MF all the way. Thus, the lenses cost exactly the same as the normal canon cameras, providing they are EF lenses.

 

For steady shots, the EOS-D range all now have mirror lock-up so that the image is razor sharp. with less moving parts than that of a 35mm, it can potentially be sharper.

 

i think for someone who wants to begin learning, 35mm can put people off because of the costs of developing and purchasing film. that, and developing is only really feasible in B+W. C42 developign is VERY awkward and costly to set up.

 

i think that some of my samples above will show that for a D-SLR, the sharpness is pretty darn good for someone that is picking up photography and wants to experiment with macro, motion and composition photography.

 

granted, more skill is required on a manual (i have both manual and d-slrs) and i have indeed had some excellent results from my old minolta. however, the digital rebel is so unbelievably versatile (sames 10D/20D etc etc), that i wouldnt really bother to go back. it has faster shutter speeds (up to 1/4000 rather than 1/2000), more flexibility of ISO settings (ok, you can shove any film into the minolta, but, anything past 800 can be pricey for decent film), has intelligent white balance settings and functions, is mega light (!), has excellent drive mode, the sports setting has an AF servo so that it tracks moving objects rather well, has intuitive metering....

 

... i could go on and on!

 

the old skool method is to yes, go full manual and step up from there. i do however believe that the D-SLR is ideal because you can do all of the things a manual camera allows.

 

just my $0.02 as someone who is lucky enough to use and experience both systems on a regular basis :lol:

 

i will just say one thing: in perfect conditions, nothing and i mean NOTHING can beat a crisp, colourful and beautifully sharp still image on an ISO100 film (my pref is fuji). digital is getting very close though...

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