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Water Cooling FAQ


Nerm
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Ok... this is a place that we can kinda orginize many of the commonly asked questions about Water Cooling.

 

Feel free to submit to this thread in a Q&A format... a staff member will edit this message from time to time with the new FAQ. :)

 

If you have an actual question, post in the forum, not this thread.

 

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Search The Forums : Asking For Help Guidelines : Overclockers Club Site Rules

 

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Q: Which kit is the best?

A: Most pre-built kits are very lack-luster and perform not much better then a good aircooling set-up. Some, although, are exceptionally good, such as a kit from DangerDen.com, DtekCustoms.com's Flowmaster XT kit or Asetek's Waterchill kits. The best choice, although, is always building your own with individual parts from online stores and parts from your local hardware store.

 

Q: What tubing size is the best?

A: Well, generally speaking, 1/2" ID tubing will allow for the most unrestricted flow rates, thus, lower temperatures.

 

Q: What should I use for my watercooling liquid?

A: The most common is a combination of distilled water and an anti-corrosion/anti-bacterial fluid, such as Redline Water Wetter or Zerex Super Coolant. This is the cheapest and easiest method. Other liquds that can be used is de-ionized water or FluidXP, both of which are supposed to be non-conductive. Even though these liquids are non-conductive, it may become contaminated if it leaks, so the whole non-conductive property is a defeated purpose.

 

Q: Do I need a NorthBridge block?

A: No, a north bridge water block basically justs causes the water line to loose precious pressure. A NB can be effectively cooled with a good air solution, such as the Microcool Northpole or the Thermalright NB1-C.

 

Q: What kind of pump should I use?

A: It depends on how many blocks and how long your waterline is. Usually, a single block set-up only needs a pump with around 200GPH and at least 6 ft. of head. Usually, the head height matters alot more then the GPH, because it means how far it can push the water before the water stops moving. The more head, the better. Also, the pumps brand matter alot. The most common brand of pumps used in a w/cing set-up are: Eheim, Hydor, Swiftech, Danger Den and Danner Supreme. Via Aqua is also used alot, but it has a high chance to be very leaky and noisy.

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Q: What kind of radiator should I use?

 

A: The type of radiator you should use depends on a number of factors. First of all, your case must be big enough to fit some of the larger radiators such as the Black Ice Extreme II and Double Heater Cores. These radiators are large and will need a lot of room, but they are very effective. Smaller cases may be able to fit the smaller radiators such as the single 120mm ones such as the Black Ice Extreme and heater cores. Even the smaller radiators will most likely need a case modification of some kind, so if you are after radiators with little or no case mods at all, you should look at the Black Ice Extreme Micro (80mm) or Swiftech MCR80-F1 (80mm). Keep in mind, these smaller radiators dissipate MUCH less heat from the water.

 

 

 

Q: Is it necessary for me to use a reservoir?

 

A: In most cases it is quite beneficial to use a reservoir. A reservoir can help to get you the lowest temps out of your system possible. Because the water has time to rest in the reservoir, the water has a chance to cool down more, thus giving you better temps. Also, most people find that filling and bleeding their system is MUCH easier with a reservoir and also it helps to eliminate air bubbles in the tubing since the bubbles will rise in the reservoir.

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  • 5 months later...

Q: What is the best CPU block out there?

 

A: Well, there really isnt a BEST block, it all depends on your application. If you're using a pump that pushes a relatively average amount of liquid, then a Swiftech MCW-6000 series block should be just right, as it doesnt need alot of flow, but gives pretty good temperatures. If you want the ABSOLUTE best block, look no further than a block from PolarFLO TT series block or DangerDenTDX/RBX series block. Both of these brands have top-notch CPU blocks. These blocks, however, need a high flow pump and work best with 1/2in. ID tubing.

 

Q: Is a GPU block worth it?

 

A: In my personal opinion, no, unless you're going for an insanely high GPU overclock. GPu blocks just add more heat, make a bigger pressure drop than a CPU block only set-up and usually add only ~15-30 more MHz on a GPU overclock than an arctic silencer. Plus, they can get pretty pricey.

 

Q: Radiator, Heatercore or Trans-cooler?

 

A: Basically, all 3 of these things do the same thing, cool down the liquid that passes through them. But what REALLY matters is A. Price and B. performance. Usually, the best of both worlds comes from a heatercore, which can easily be found at your local auto parts store. Heatercores are very effective when cooling and can be found in sizes perfect for a single 120mm fan that can be mounted in your case all the way up to 3 or even 4 120mm fans. A trans-cooler can also, but usually you cant find the "perfect size" and isnt as effective as a heatercore. A radiator is specially made for PC watercooling, so they generally pull in 1-2C better temps than a heatercore, but are generally WAY more expensive because of manufacturing and painting. What's ironic, though, is that some companies basically TAKE heatercore, paint it, add a shroud, and market it as their own product and jack the price up. Other companies take heatercores and do the same but specifically say its a heatercore, like D-Tek which sells their heatercores for around 10 dollars more than at your local autostore, but it comes with correct barb fittings and is painted.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

Q: Is watercooling expencive?

A: It depends on how much you expect to pay. If you are looking for something under $100 then yes, it is expencive. If you are expecting to spend $500 then you are overpaying. A very good W/C will cost you between $300 and $400.

 

Q: Should I buy everything from the same place?

A: No, shop around for the best deals, but if posible, buy parts from the same website, to avoid having to pay the shiping fees again.

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