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d3bruts1d

Building A New Computer.

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<--- late comer,

 

um,......(clearing throat)

......sup

 

if you are installing the CPU heatsink yourself make sure you properly place it over to make perfect contact,be very careful when using athlon xp chips,they are great performers but its delicate core needs concerns,so make sure you take precautions with these micro thingys because they dont cost 10 dollars,

,enyce

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Rule number one make sure NOTHING in you new computer says Intel or ATI on it anywhere (look carefully) :P

 

Seriously make sure to research your components to make sure you are getting parts that work well together.

 

NEVER go cheap on the power supply or heatsink.

 

Try to get the best motherboard you can for your platform for future upgrades.

 

No such thing as too much RAM but 1Gb is plenty for today's apps. Be sure to use Quality RAM as well.

 

Dirt, heat, and static are your enemy take spcial care to keep clean and static free. Use quality fans and plenty of them.

 

READ THE MANUALS!!!!!! especially for the motherboard!! :D

Edited by txtiggerr

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These tip is not my own, but rather one I read over on Guru3d.com. I wish I had read it before I constructed my first build, so might as well put it here so new builders don't read it later and have the same remorse I have at times.

 

From http://www.guru3d.com/guide/pcbuilding/index1.shtml

You don't look at your computer; you look at your monitor... ...so do your eyes a favor, and get the most expensive, feature-leaden, refresh monster of a monitor that you can afford.

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As far as monitors go, I would suggest a flat-screen (doesn't have to be a LCD), because CRT monitors put greater strain on your eyes.

 

If you goto lanpartys, get a case carrier, cases get alot heavier with all the parts in them.

 

**Make sure you buy a surge protector.**

If you spend 800-3000 dollars on a machine, what is 30-50 dollars for a good surge protector. (Battery backups are nice, but not nescessary)

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I am by no means a computer "expert", I have taught myself how and have build my past 4 computers. More from necessity then anything, initially I simply could not afford to buy what I wanted unless I built it myself, then later it was because I actually enjoyed the research and the building!

 

My most recent computer was my first attempt at a "modded" look.

I bought a sweet aluminum case with top notch power supply, fast AMD with lots of RAM and highly rated videocard. Plexiglass panel on the side of the case with my heatsink fan having colored LED lights. Looks good, runs great, I have never overclocked, don't know how and too afraid of burning something up.

 

With that background given, here is my #1 suggestion:

My current beauty has 5 fans, 1 front, 1 side, 1 back, 1 cpu, 1videocard...

This thing is too dang loud.

I never paid any attention to noise reduction design until I wound up with an irritatingly noisy PC....

 

So here is one of my pointers, try and choose cooling options that are quiet!

 

I am about to give this wonderful PC to my children and build a new one, so any thoughts on quiet PC cooling is appreciated, but I think it is an important consideration in your PC build.

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Wear Latex gloves when building a new rig. The keep fingerprints and grease off of the parts and the case.

Edited by insane_bobo

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Don't work quickly to get it done. Your building the computer for a good reason don't ruin it by working quickly. :D You never know if you do you may boot your computer only to have it catch on fire. :rolleyes:

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try to always use brand name parts

don't use soyo orion or anything else tht you never haerd of

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Apply the thermal compound (grease) per the manufactures instructions, different brands apply differently, and it also depends on which cpu that you are using. I never use the grease that comes with them and use something like acetone, brake clean, or I use contact cleaner that has the ingredients that the Arctic silver 5 says to use. I use lint free coffee filters and when I have got all that factory grease off with the contact cleaner I then use 99.9% alcohol. I had to order it from the pharmacy. The lower percents like 50%/70% leave water or some kind of residue on the heat sink and fan, for example a P4 and Intel and arctic 5

 

http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

 

:foldon:

Edited by road-runner

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I know it's been mentioned before, but ALWAYS mod you case BEFORE assembling your computer in it. :D

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If you are new to building comps and bought a SATA HD, When you load Windows and it doesn't see your hard drive, you need to press F6 and load the SATA controller drivers either built in to the motherboard or a PCI, from a diskette.

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And remember most expensive doesn't always mean best. Research, research, research.

Edited by Nkit420

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