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+/- Whats The Difference?


Newport

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I am having another random occurrance of the noob syndrome....... What is the difference bewteen lets say a CD/DVD-Rw and a CD/DVD+Rw??? What do the signs mean and what is the better option to get? I was looking on newegg just for fun to look at optical drives and i noticed that i had several options (+ and or - for CD R and RW, DVD R and RW etc.)

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well that made no sense to me lol.... the "+" is the type that can rewrite more information then the"-"?? Thats the idea i got... i know thats not right so what the heck... That site was made for someone who has a degree in optical drives... can someone just explain it in plain english for me??

 

And if i just google it, then whats teh use of this forum asking for help?

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I think the 4th link has what you want:

"As explained in the previous sections, there are two main formats: "dash" (DVD-R/RW) and "plus" (DVD+R/RW). There's not much difference between them. They both record data and video, and they both read back data and play back video. Both formats are available as recordable drives for computers and as home video recorders. In spite of claims that one format is more compatible with players and drives, both formats are similarly compatible (see 4.3.1). There are speed differences, but it's a game of leapfrog. One format will come out with faster write speeds, then the other one will match it or surpass it. In 2003, drives reached 8x speeds. 16x is the theoretical maximum, so both formats will soon hit the limit.

 

The biggest thing to worry about is that DVD-RW drives only record on -R and -RW discs, and DVD+RW drives only record on +R and +RW discs, so you have to make sure you get the right kind of blank discs. You may worry that one of the formats might "win" and the other format could disappear, leaving you with abandoned hardware. This is not very likely, since both formats are doing well. Luckily there is a simple solution to both concerns: buy a dual-format, or "combo" drive. Many companies make DVD-/+RW drives that write to both kinds of discs. Dual-format drives cost a bit more, but it's cheap insurance.

 

The DVD+RW format has a few advantages when used in a computer, but if data backup or access speed is important, also consider the DVD-RAM format. DVD-RAM is fast and reliable, and the discs have an optional cartridge to help protect data. Most DVD-RAM drives also write DVD-R/RW discs, and some super combo drives write all three formats."

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I think the 4th link has what you want:

"As explained in the previous sections, there are two main formats: "dash" (DVD-R/RW) and "plus" (DVD+R/RW). There's not much difference between them. They both record data and video, and they both read back data and play back video. Both formats are available as recordable drives for computers and as home video recorders. In spite of claims that one format is more compatible with players and drives, both formats are similarly compatible (see 4.3.1). There are speed differences, but it's a game of leapfrog. One format will come out with faster write speeds, then the other one will match it or surpass it. In 2003, drives reached 8x speeds. 16x is the theoretical maximum, so both formats will soon hit the limit.

 

The biggest thing to worry about is that DVD-RW drives only record on -R and -RW discs, and DVD+RW drives only record on +R and +RW discs, so you have to make sure you get the right kind of blank discs. You may worry that one of the formats might "win" and the other format could disappear, leaving you with abandoned hardware. This is not very likely, since both formats are doing well. Luckily there is a simple solution to both concerns: buy a dual-format, or "combo" drive. Many companies make DVD-/+RW drives that write to both kinds of discs. Dual-format drives cost a bit more, but it's cheap insurance.

 

The DVD+RW format has a few advantages when used in a computer, but if data backup or access speed is important, also consider the DVD-RAM format. DVD-RAM is fast and reliable, and the discs have an optional cartridge to help protect data. Most DVD-RAM drives also write DVD-R/RW discs, and some super combo drives write all three formats."

:withstupid::foldon:

Yea the 4th link sums it up.

Newport how else do you think most of us get our information? We all Google it. :P

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There are sites where people who duplicate movies, rate the various drives and discs for that purposes. Similarly, there are sites where people who burn data do the same thing.

 

Last I read it was "Use + for movies and - for data" was the general consensus.

 

As for drives, I've had no problems with my NEC 8x or Plextor 8x; the Plextor is faster.

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Well it just so happenes that you are talking to the 1st class leader of lazyness captain Newport! lol i dont wanna google! i wanna have my cake and eat it too! :P

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