Jump to content

Real mind-bender


stormhawk31
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here's the issue: if I shut my computer down for any reason, whether I do it through the Windows shutdown command, manually, of whatever, it will NOT turn back on, sometimes for days or weeks. If it's plugged in, I get power (I can see the green light on my video card), but nothing I do will get the damned thing to turn back on. I can't figure this out, and it's been happening for months. PLEASE help me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd bet your psu is shot ! I had one that when it would not power up if I held a hair dryer to the back of it for 4 or 5 minutes it would power up. What happens is the caps lose their charge when it was off for awhile.

 

Strongest solution so far. Have a spare PSU you can test with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. It was absolutely the power supply. I had to go out and buy a new one, and since I was short on cash, I had to buy a non-modular, 600 watt power supply, which is 150 watts less than my modular power supply. But, it works. Unfortunately, I'll have to buy ANOTHER power supply in the near future, because I'll soon have 10 4 tb hard drives, plus a 1 tb laptop hard drive, plus my 200 gb SSD, plus two graphics cards, plus 32 gigs of memory... My buddy recommends going to a 1000 watt power supply, and I think he may be right. And that's going to produce a LOT of heat. Anyone know where I can go to learn how to effectively cool my case?  :teehee:

Edited by stormhawk31

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

System specs outside the basics provided would be a big help! 

 

The best way to cool the case is to make sure that you have as much airflow in as you do out if you are running non reference cards. If you are running reference cards they are better at pushing the thermal load out of the chassis so you can increase the airflow into the chassis. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems to be bad luck going around here for PSUs haha

 

That being said, just because a unit has a higher output rating doesn't necessarily mean it will run hotter, in fact it may run cooler if it's in a better efficiency threshold than a smaller unit that's working its little heart out trying to convert all that current from AC to DC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a help, now if you can give us what brand case you have, how many fans in it and what kind of cpu cooler (stock or aftermarket) we may be able to at least give you some pointers. As for now the only thing I can see that may run bit warm would be the cpu. :teehee:

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp
I just borrowed this link from another tread ! :whistling:

Edited by SpikeSoprano

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also tell us how you use  your system - what sort of load will the hardware see?  Light gaming?  Hardcore gaming?  Will you overclock?  What is the climate where you live? Anchorage? Tuscon?  What room will it be in - 3rd floor attic bedroom in the sun next to a furnace vent, or cool basement?  All of these things factor in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...