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BiPolar

Replacement fan for XFX R7 250 low profile

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The fan on my card is a freaking jet engine and for HTPC use (along with my gaming) it's fairly unacceptable.

 

I'm trying to find a lower cost 3rd party fan to replace, but the resources out there seem pretty slim.

 

Alternatively, I'm considering getting the HIS iCooler HD7750 which looks pretty quiet, but that seems kinda silly if I can just get a better fan.

 

Thoughts?

 

edit: apologies if wrong board - wasn't sure if it went under Cooling or Video Cards. Mods: feel free to move this.

Edited by BiPolar

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Excellent question :) I've got a buyer for the R7, so "upgrading" to the HD7750 would be about $50. I'd say i'd be under that to make it worthwhile. The problem seems to be that it's an R7 and low profile. The HD 7750 might be the 'easier' option, but i'm worried about the sound (although it's rated to 31 db, which is pretty good - but more silent is better for my purposes.)

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Yep, the VF900-CU is a great choice for lower end cards, but by the time you figure in the cost.................... $40 bucks give or take?

 

Is low profile an absolute because of your case?

 

OP - IMHO your best bet is to consider something like this;

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127763

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You could always explore other options

 

Literally replacing the fan works, if load temps arent too high already. Manual fan speed control. Thermal adhesive a stock intel heatsink to the gpu with better fan, new old stock heat sinks....

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Thermal adhesive a stock intel heatsink to the gpu with better fan, new old stock heat sinks....

 

Please do not ever do this unless you're running the board in a reverse ATX case. You do not want that much weight pulling on the GPU as the solder under it gets hot ( and soft ) during load, this will lead to solder fracturing over time as every time the solder becomes soft from the heat generated by use, the massive heat-sink will be pulling the GPU slowly away from the PCB. You should never affix a massive heat-sink to a GPU with epoxy but instead use zip-ties. In a reverse ATX case, this would work because the weight of the heatsink will be pushing the GPU towards the PCB, not pulling it away from the PCB. 

 

While I agree CPU heat-sinks make excellent GPU heat-sinks, they also weigh a ton and require very creative modding to get them properly affixed. On the upside of doing this, I used to use Socket A stock heatsink's on Radeon 9800's to OC the GPU's well beyond 9800XT speeds and they still ran cooler than stock 9800 Pro temps under load.

 

Very true, I thought I added that detail in but forgot to :yucky:. Not too hard to drill and tap the base on some CPU heat sinks to use bolts as well

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