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El_Capitan

This is why I like delidding Ivy Bridge CPU's

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i7 3770K at 5.1GHz @ 1.464V's never going above 69C.

i5 3570K at 4.4GHz @ 1.200V's never going above 46C (have lots of overclocking room).

 

1dwz.png

 

eo4l.png

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Looks nice but when I prime the first 15 minutes is the easy part. I come from the 24 hour prime stable club using half the available memory at least.  

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Looks nice but when I prime the first 15 minutes is the easy part. I come from the 24 hour prime stable club using half the available memory at least.  

 

I'll try that sometime to see the temp difference. I probably won't be as proud. :P

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By about 2 hours in you will hit your max temps but the heat soak over 24 hours puts the whole package to the test. Still 5.1 is pretty badass. 

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Why not push the I5?

 

Just haven't gotten around to it. I just put it at 4.4GHz and 1.2V's and looked to see if it was stable. :P

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Hey Cap - do you use the careful and gentle razor blade method to de-lid, or the brute put it in a vice and knock the hell out it method?

 

What kind of TIM do you usually use after de-lid?

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Hey Cap - do you use the careful and gentle razor blade method to de-lid, or the brute put it in a vice and knock the hell out it method?

 

What kind of TIM do you usually use after de-lid?

 

I use the vice and hammer (with wood block), but it's not brute force. It's a gentle tap or two. So far I've delidded eight 3570K's, two 3770K's, and a 4670K with no failure rates.

 

I use Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra for the die and IHS, and Noctua NH-1 for the TIM with the heatsink.

Edited by El_Capitan

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Nice to see someone who is not afraid of CPU modding (man do I look like a sheep now  :bunny: (take note that there is no sheep emoticon))

 

More seriously, three questions arise:

 

Are you concerned that dust can get in contact of die since you removed the IHS, or does the Coolaboratory stuff hardens with heat and time?

 

How does putting that stuff works?

 

I have seen a review, and they specified that it is not for the faint of heart, as it mimics a bit soldering, because of the hardening and the fastening.

 

Just curious !

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Are you concerned that dust can get in contact of die since you removed the IHS

Dust won't hurt the die. :)

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Hey Cap - do you use the careful and gentle razor blade method to de-lid, or the brute put it in a vice and knock the hell out it method?

 

What kind of TIM do you usually use after de-lid?

 

I use the vice and hammer (with wood block), but it's not brute force. It's a gentle tap or two. So far I've delidded eight 3570K's, two 3770K's, and a 4670K with no failure rates.

 

I use Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra for the die and IHS, and Noctua NH-1 for the TIM with the heatsink.

 

 

does it have to be a wood block? can i use something else say a rubber block? i've been looking around for a guide but all of them use wood block... i couldn't find any wood block that is soft enough like pine( i live in the tropics, so soft wood is a rare comodity here :dunno: ) maybe you can post a guide here for all of us with ivy/haswell chip :thumbsup:

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Looking good! I don't think my 3770k can do 5ghz, but I've never taken it over 1.45v yet and haven't messed with it too much so I'm not sure.

 

15min is a great test for the normal temps you will see, but to stress the loop you need at least an hour. That is when the water temps start to creep up :)

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