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Buying a Motorcycle

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Ah you're right it does! I only saw a couple pictures of it before and didn't notice the passenger pegs...and the passenger "seat" didn't look very accomodating :P

 

 

Yeah I saw you mentioned that (which is odd since you seem pretty anti 250 :P ), that's cool though. So you two do private lessons for some pocket change I guess as well as to help people get their licenses huh. Btw how does that work, do you have a whole bunch of waivers that you just sign and they're good?. I jumped right onto my Ninja after passing the riding course on a 200cc scooter

 

It's all good though, though oddly when I finally move out and get my own place/house, I'd like to pick up a Ninja300 or something smaller for gas mileage and fun. (maybe I'd even make it pretty sporty and actually try out a track day on it) and either keep my FZ6 or sell it to my dad since he really likes it (he has a '85 VFR700 and shares the same distaste for carburetors I do). Either way, here's to her coming around so you could get that FZ-09 :)

 

Yeah, we will do private lessons but our overhead means that for most folks that's not really a viable option, financially.  It more or less costs us the same to do it for one person or a full class of eight students so we mostly only teach the course to a full class.  Most folks are scared off when they hear how much it will cost them to have us do a completely private BRC where they're the only student but we have done a couple for a few folks.  To be able to give out the DDS waivers (which keeps our students from having to take the written and riding test when they go to DDS to get their license) we first had to go through a state program before they would sign off on us being basically an off-site license examiner.  Once (and if) the folks pass the course we record their current drivers license information and trasmit that, along with their scores, to the state's database and issue them a waiver showing course completion which they take to DDS within 90 days.  That waiver is basically verified against that information that we upload to DDS following their completion of the course and tells the DDS employees at whatever facility that choose to go to that they are to be issued a class M license as any testing requirements they normally would have to fulfill onsite have already been completed.

 

But our business is completely private other than that affiliation with GA DDS and obviously our affiliation with and certification by MSF as RiderCoaches, and as a business it is ran for profit, although we both are involved in this particular field because we love to ride and believe in the benefits of approaching the sport with a mindset toward common sense and safety.  Personally I enjoy helping others learn to ride and kinda have a passion for it, so that plays a large part in why I do it.  Getting paid to do something you love ain't bad at all.

 

And I'm definitely not anti 250, just realistic.  If you're gonna ride, you're gonna outgrow a 250, probably pretty quickly, and find yourself wanting a bit more.  It's almost a guaranteed inevitability.   :evilgrin:

 

I see, must be fun then! I see a couple rider coaches on the FZ6 forums too, they say sometimes there are full dress Harleys or Goldwings taking the BRC, that's insane for me to imagine maneuvering a bike that size around a tight course.

 

I wish they had more middleweights though, like really strong and light 400-500cc motorcycles that are fuel injected and modern. I can't see myself ever needing more than 600 though, the way I see it, IMHO if you aren't pushing your bike to its max ATLEAST half the time you ride, than you don't need that larger displacement machine.

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Nothing wrong with carbs... learning to work on them is easy and they do require maintenance... drain them in the winter and run them dry and then just fill and fire in spring...no issue. My buddy has a carbed R6 and its fast as hell....simple hop up mods.

 

I learned on a Honda 200 twin (early rebel) and you do outgrow a small bike rather quick...I moved from that right into a a nice 1980 Kawasaki kz650 still have it and ride it to this day. got it in 1990. It has been slightly modded and runs great and it's LOUD! added a 4-into-1 header and pulled the baffle...

 

I just this morning filled out the paper work for a new ZX1000r so we'll see. i figure at my age a new bike should be good and  it adds to the Splat factor LOL

But I know they're inherently worse and archaic lol. Not that my Ninja gave me any problems with carb "problems", the choking and warming up to run like it should was getting old (especially my on 5 mile ride to work)

 

Lol that would be loud, both my sisters have licenses as well but no bikes (and ironically they took the BRC), but my one sister either wants a Triumph Bonneville (I think this'd be a bit much for her since she's small frame and hasn't gotten on a bike since the BRC) so I think a nice Rebel 250 would be nice for her.

 

MAN that's an upgrade! You're gonna probably be floored by the difference between that and your KZ haha.

 

It's odd, I love when people keep up old cars and bikes but I don't like outdated vehicle technology, especially when it's less efficient and dirtier to the point where drive/rideability gets affected.

 

 

It's not that they are worse... carbs make more horsepower than injection... but they DO require tuning time to time. most all carb bikes require a jet change for add-ons or in some cases the bike comes in General tune. it is easier to change jets than it is to reflash the ECU. there arent a lot of places doing custom bike tuning for the ECU.

 

the zx10r is almost 200 hp at the tire with the foreign flash and simple mods... base tune it's more around 175hp.... my kz650 is 48hp stock... it's probably pushing 60hp which doesnt sound like a lot but on a 400 pound bike it will run mid 12s in the 1/4 mile and 0-60 in 3 seconds easy. but more like 2 seconds if you can keep the tire down... lol

 

 

 

EDIT: I ALWAYS recommend a person looking into and taking an ABATE motorcycle course.... the beginner is 2-day and they supply the bikes..... 

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It's not that they are worse... carbs make more horsepower than injection... but they DO require tuning time to time. most all carb bikes require a jet change for add-ons or in some cases the bike comes in General tune. it is easier to change jets than it is to reflash the ECU. there arent a lot of places doing custom bike tuning for the ECU.

 

the zx10r is almost 200 hp at the tire with the foreign flash and simple mods... base tune it's more around 175hp.... my kz650 is 48hp stock... it's probably pushing 60hp which doesnt sound like a lot but on a 400 pound bike it will run mid 12s in the 1/4 mile and 0-60 in 3 seconds easy. but more like 2 seconds if you can keep the tire down... lol

 

EDIT: I ALWAYS recommend a person looking into and taking an ABATE motorcycle course.... the beginner is 2-day and they supply the bikes..... 

 

I know, but I feel the small HP sacrifice is a necessary evil for how much better they are emission/maintenance wise, just like I'm all about power bumps but I'll never remove my cat on my bike or car to get small gains.

Carbs are definitely cheaper to squeeze more power out of, I'll give you that but they'll pretty finicky unless you know what you're doing (not that ECU fuel map tuning is a cake walk either but it's more reliable once you set it all right once).

 

Yeah... that's what I mean though, you're going to be TRIPLING your power and probably not adding much more weight. I have no doubt the KZ is fun on its own though, never said that and seeing as how you know your way around a carb, I'm betting it's as good as it'll get!

 

But yeah I know I've been real bad never taking a BRC or any course for that matter, I want to find the time this summer to take one. I was debating the BRC2 but my friend still has his permit (the one who bought my Ninja) so maybe I'll just take the BRC with him and he can get his license and I'll benefit with the experience. Do you know if they'd let me use my FZ6 though?? I'd want to have the added challenge of its weight and simply better control it at lower speeds than whatever small bikes they'd usually provide.

Edited by IVIYTH0S

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I know, but I feel the small HP sacrifice is a necessary evil for how much better they are emission/maintenance wise, just like I'm all about power bumps but I'll never remove my cat on my bike or car to get small gains.

Carbs are definitely cheaper to squeeze more power out of, I'll give you that but they'll pretty finicky unless you know what you're doing (not that ECU fuel map tuning is a cake walk either but it's more reliable once you set it all right once).

 

Yeah... that's what I mean though, you're going to be TRIPLING your power and probably not adding much more weight. I have no doubt the KZ is fun on its own though, never said that and seeing as how you know your way around a carb, I'm betting it's as good as it'll get!

 

But yeah I know I've been real bad never taking a BRC or any course for that matter, I want to find the time this summer to take one. I was debating the BRC2 but my friend still has his permit (the one who bought my Ninja) so maybe I'll just take the BRC with him and he can get his license and I'll benefit with the experience. Do you know if they'd let me use my FZ6 though?? I'd want to have the added challenge of its weight and simply better control it at lower speeds than whatever small bikes they'd usually provide.

 

Couldn't say as far as using your own bike, a lot of times for the BRC the bikes are provided.  In your case the BRC2 (used to be called the Advanced RiderCourse) would be a better bet.  They changed the name because Advanced RiderCourse was a bit of a misnomer as it doesn't really teach any more advanced skills or strategies than the BRC, it is instead essentially just the second day riding portion of the BRC.  This does away with the real basic content like, "Ok, here's your clutch, here's how it works," etc. and just assumes a basic amount of knowledge and understanding on the student's part.  It's a one day course that still gets you a license (if you don't already have one, which is why a lot of the more experienced riders decide to take it in the first place) and generally requires the rider to use their own bike.  So if you wanted to use your bike that's the route I'd go as you'd have to devote less time to the course and you would essentially get the same out of it as you would the BRC since you've already got a working knowledge of motorcycles, how they work, and all that.  

 

Edit: I'm assuming that the BRC2 that's offered in your area grants a license waiver upon completion like we do when I teach it, but of course I'd double check before committing.  If your friend needs a license and has already been riding a while it might be a good option for him as well.  Like I said, you really just miss out on some very basic motorcycle familiarization and a bit of depth from the classroom portion of the BRC, but the riding part is near identical to the second day of the BRC itself.  Something to consider.

Edited by Bizzlenitch

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