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Help with overclocking on Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3


streng
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Hello, I just built a rig for my wife and I wanted to have a decent overclock on, but I am new to overclocking.  I am having issue with my overclock, and specifically the motherboard maintaining a voltage that will sustain the overclock.  I followed the guide from Jays2cents, but overclocked using the unlocked multiplier rather than mess with the clock.  I changed all of the similar settings I had on my board, but in Jay's guide he was using an ASUS board that seemed easier and better at OC'ing.  Some of the features I was either unable to alter or were not altered: CPU Vcore, NB/PCIe/PLL Voltage, CPU PLL Voltage, VCore Loadline Calibration.  All of these settings are still on "Auto".  I am assuming one of these settings is the reason I am unable to achieve my desired outcome, but I don't want to type in something incorrectly and mess up the rig.  In Windows my system will run at 1.32 volts @ 4.2 ghz, and when I start prime95 the voltage drops to around 1.176 and reduces the frequency to 3.5 ghz.  I want to be around 4.6 ghz 24/7, but I don't know that I can accomplish that my limited OC experience.  Any help would be much appreciated.

 

System configuration:

 

AMD FX-8320

Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3

Corsair H100i extreme

Thermaltake tough grand 850w PSU

ATI HD 5870's in crossfire

OCZ Vertex 460 SSD

Corsair Carbide 500R

LG DVD Rom

Windows 8.1 64 bit.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

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Have you tried using gigabyte's touch bios or et6, they will give you a good idea of what your board is capable of, then you could write down their settings, try lowering your cpu voltage ( because those programs tend to give the cpu too much voltage) and go from there. There should be a setting in the bios for load line calabration which you can set at about 5 to see if it stabilizes your cpu volts.Try to keep the cpu volts around 1.40 to 1.43 for a 4.5 ghz oc, too high will cause too much heat and could damage the cpu. Use a hw monitoring tool to monitor your temps always.

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I have used two UD3 boards, see if fiddling with the load line calibration to reduce vdroop. It could help. Sometime loadline overshoots its goal so be sure to watch it in CPUZ or another program. With my 1156 I found that the best way to fight the vdroop was to leave power saving features on and give it extra volts. When it idles down the volts go down and when it needs the power it has plenty without overheating. 

If your temps are low maybe try more volts, I think 1.45 wouldn't be too far out of the norm if the vdroop is still seems to be an issue. 

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