Jump to content

Hm may start soldering


kennethk
 Share

Recommended Posts

I tried to when I was younger but never really got into the whole soldering scene, whenever I did I'd get too nervous and my hands would start shaking however now that I've had build up a bit of confidence working with electronics I might start soldering again.

 

But which cheap parts would any of you with experience9zdqbAD.pngsuggest I get?

 

What would you suggest I get? I still need some Kynar wire. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't ever used a cordless soldering iron but I would expect them to be under powered. The one you listed looks like a Weller BP860MP knockoff. If you get a cordless get the real deal.

40 watts is the minimum I would recommend, the extra power is essential if you ever need to do something with thicker wire.

I have a pair of Radio Shack helping hands, they aren't the best quality but can come in handy (pun intended).I prefer lead solder over solder without lead. I usually use flux core solder because I don't understand flux and I am a bit lazy. 

 

40watt or better irons generally heat up faster and get hotter, the latter may be good or bad for your application.. You might just be better off dropping $40 on a Weller Base soldering station. I have thrown away more than my share of cheap soldering irons. Adjustable heat, lots of soldering tip options, and it will last awhile. Weller is sort of the standard in the hobby soldering world. Elenco is good too, I'm just a Weller guy. 

http://www.amazon.com/Weller-WLC100-40-Watt-Soldering-Station/dp/B000AS28UC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1394780943&sr=8-1&keywords=soldering+station

Bare bones starter kit would be this Elenco Kit for $15 http://www.amazon.com/Elenco-Electronics-ST-12-Soldering-Tool/dp/B0002LLWZY/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1394785147&sr=8-13&keywords=40+watt+soldering+iron#productDetails 

The elenco kit will be a little underpowered but wont be bad, just not great. 

 

No matter what iron you end up with get a few different soldering tips and a cheap solder pump too. Temperature control is very nice to have, I would say it is essential to being able to do a good job.

 

The general rule of tool purchases apply here:

Get what you can afford. If you can only get the cheap one, get the cheap one. Anything that says light duty (like the one you listed) will break after about 5 hours use. Light duty hobby stuff is exactly what it says "Light Duty. 

Quality cost money with tools. I'm not saying get the most expensive, just get something that will actually work.

Find a nice used one. Often times with tools in general, a lightly used model will out perform anything in that price range that is new.

 

The next one I buy will be a Weller WES51 soldering station, it has good reserve power for bigger jobs and stable heat. I wish I just would have bought the nice one first. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't ever used a cordless soldering iron but I would expect them to be under powered. The one you listed looks like a Weller BP860MP knockoff. If you get a cordless get the real deal.

40 watts is the minimum I would recommend, the extra power is essential if you ever need to do something with thicker wire.

I have a pair of Radio Shack helping hands, they aren't the best quality but can come in handy (pun intended).I prefer lead solder over solder without lead. I usually use flux core solder because I don't understand flux and I am a bit lazy. 

 

40watt or better irons generally heat up faster and get hotter, the latter may be good or bad for your application.. You might just be better off dropping $40 on a Weller Base soldering station. I have thrown away more than my share of cheap soldering irons. Adjustable heat, lots of soldering tip options, and it will last awhile. Weller is sort of the standard in the hobby soldering world. Elenco is good too, I'm just a Weller guy. 

http://www.amazon.com/Weller-WLC100-40-Watt-Soldering-Station/dp/B000AS28UC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1394780943&sr=8-1&keywords=soldering+station

Bare bones starter kit would be this Elenco Kit for $15 http://www.amazon.com/Elenco-Electronics-ST-12-Soldering-Tool/dp/B0002LLWZY/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1394785147&sr=8-13&keywords=40+watt+soldering+iron#productDetails 

The elenco kit will be a little underpowered but wont be bad, just not great. 

 

No matter what iron you end up with get a few different soldering tips and a cheap solder pump too. Temperature control is very nice to have, I would say it is essential to being able to do a good job.

 

The general rule of tool purchases apply here:

Get what you can afford. If you can only get the cheap one, get the cheap one. Anything that says light duty (like the one you listed) will break after about 5 hours use. Light duty hobby stuff is exactly what it says "Light Duty. 

Quality cost money with tools. I'm not saying get the most expensive, just get something that will actually work.

Find a nice used one. Often times with tools in general, a lightly used model will out perform anything in that price range that is new.

 

The next one I buy will be a Weller WES51 soldering station, it has good reserve power for bigger jobs and stable heat. I wish I just would have bought the nice one first. 

Thanks for the information! I'll mainly be soldering on modchips to boards so I don't really need to go all out. Just think it's time I tried it again and buy a few good parts. So I don't really want to spend anything over 50 including the cip

 

Changed some parts around but not sure if I need the flux...The stuff the guy was using was in liquid form not so much a grease

 

Yf5b39X.png

 

I think it was just flux liquid instead of paste...

Edited by kennethk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done quite a bit of soldering and have never used flux or paste ( except for copper water pipes) . Just make sure you get top quality electrical solder wire and like stated above a fine tip solder iron or gun.  A mid range kit should do you fine and should cost about 20 to 30 dollars, Weller is a decent brand as GT stated. The best way to get it right is practice doing a few joints before you start on the circuit board and don't overheat the board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weller Portasol the gas powered one for when you want a portable soldering iron. Great for working in cars and so on, has plenty of power. Can also use it as a torch and heat gun in addition to being a soldering iron.

 

For soldering audio interconnects, speaker wire and especially anything PCB based get an adjustable benchtop soldering station. You need the temp control otherwise you'll kill PCBs and components and melt PVC sheaths on cables.

 

For things that are 4AWG and above a chunky high watt plug in soldering iron is great but I doubt you'd use anything like that.

 

For PCBs and audio I personally would use silver solder its a bitch to work with as it requires a higher temp but it makes a much nicer connection in those situations. For all other situations any old solder will pretty much do.

 

Other useful things are solder wicks for cleaning up and removing solder and wire for cleaning irons. Also another nice thing to have is a stand with magnifying glass and two alligator clips, all adjustable. Makes joining wires and connectors so much easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flex is ok to have on hand. But if you get solder with the flex in the core, you wont really need it.

 

I use solder with no flex in the core. As if l have something that needs more solder then i will get more of flex on the part as well. Then you will need to get some flex cleaner as well. But for someone just staring on there is no really need for it.

 

Also something to get is a solder sucker, or wire wick like Stonerboy said. As its a pain in the ass removing unwanted solder with out any.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flex is ok to have on hand. But if you get solder with the flex in the core, you wont really need it.

 

I use solder with no flex in the core. As if l have something that needs more solder then i will get more of flex on the part as well. Then you will need to get some flex cleaner as well. But for someone just staring on there is no really need for it.

 

Also something to get is a solder sucker, or wire wick like Stonerboy said. As its a pain in the ass removing unwanted solder with out any.

You mean desolder pump right? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Flex is ok to have on hand. But if you get solder with the flex in the core, you wont really need it.

 

I use solder with no flex in the core. As if l have something that needs more solder then i will get more of flex on the part as well. Then you will need to get some flex cleaner as well. But for someone just staring on there is no really need for it.

 

Also something to get is a solder sucker, or wire wick like Stonerboy said. As its a pain in the ass removing unwanted solder with out any.

You mean desolder pump right? :)

I hate using them always found they never worked long enough or well enough. The wire wicks always worked better for me. I agree with bigball much easier to not bother with flux just get solder that already has it in the core.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...