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linuxpatriot

is going up to 1.3v safe at 4.4 ghz?

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idaho or red  ?

baked or fried ?

there you go ,impossible  !

 

 

you win this round Spike... Damn you

Edited by feetfats
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Which end of the potato will be positive (+) ?

Also I am doing a research project and I need to know what a fox says?

 

Copper electrode will be positive, zinc is negative.  So, twould be necessary to leave the electrodes in and  swap the connections to the electrode back and forth.

 

Sadly, I never learned to speak fox... hopefully they speak of things more important than we do.

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This guy is never going to come back now...

Well worse things have happened. It might not have been the nicest response but hey, he was pretty vague. 

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Which end of the potato will be positive (+) ?

Also I am doing a research project and I need to know what a fox says?

 

Copper electrode will be positive, zinc is negative. So, twould be necessary to leave the electrodes in and swap the connections to the electrode back and forth.

I personally have found success using a peanut butter based lubricant to enable faster electrode switching, as well as helping to keep temps down when aiming for a baked instead of a jacket OC which requires a higher voltage than the OP suggests (I have found success at around 2.925-3.125V, however this value varies based on variety of potato, king edwards, for example, require significantly higher voltage than others)...

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We are at the bleeding edge of overclocking. Never before have people discussed overclocking a potato camera.

Ah now this is where it gets complicated, contrary to popular belief, potato cameras are different to potatoes themselves in that they produce current based on the volume of photons that hit the camera portion of the potato itself. It can be roughly calculated by the equation 1/2*?*r*1.25*2k, where r is the radius of the potato at the thinnest point and k is the photon absorption constant of the variety of potato. In older potato cameras, where only a small section of the potato is, in fact, responsible for collecting photons, the equation must be multiplied by 1/2 of the angle subtended at the core of the potato measured in radians. Consequently, potato cameras provide a varying DC voltage (albeit at a higher voltage potential) as opposed to potatoes themselves.

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We are at the bleeding edge of overclocking. Never before have people discussed overclocking a potato camera.

Yes , but unless that potato camera is cooled with a custom water loop it could very well turn into a french fry  camera, which as  we all know has very bad resolution at a high oc.

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Which end of the potato will be positive (+) ?

Also I am doing a research project and I need to know what a fox says?

Copper electrode will be positive, zinc is negative. So, twould be necessary to leave the electrodes in and swap the connections to the electrode back and forth.
I personally have found success using a peanut butter based lubricant to enable faster electrode switching, as well as helping to keep temps down when aiming for a baked instead of a jacket OC which requires a higher voltage than the OP suggests (I have found success at around 2.925-3.125V, however this value varies based on variety of potato, king edwards, for example, require significantly higher voltage than others)...

 

 

Why am I not surprised that EuroFight is using peanut butter lube for his electrode? He's just that sort of person I guess.   :banana:

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