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is going up to 1.3v safe at 4.4 ghz?

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Why not start by at least telling us what processor it is.  You could be overclocking a potato for all we know.

Edited by feetfats

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I'm guessing the op is referring to the other thread about overclocking a i5 Haswell.

 

assuming right now all i5 / i7 haswells have the same voltage limit until a revision (which i believe )....

 

if that's the case than yeah 1.3v is fine , I wouldn't pass 1.35v though. if remember correctly you had corisar h90 cooling it , so the temp won't be that crazy .

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That's impossible to answer when there are no specs listed .

 

Not impossible at all, I am pretty sure it's a potato.  

 

If that's the case oc it to 100c for 2 minutes.

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Why not start by at least telling us what processor it is.  You could be overclocking a potato for all we know.

 

potatos produce direct current... due to the lack of alternating voltage, overclocking is unlikely.

 

Now, if all you want to do is produce alternating current from a potato battery (or any dc source), your clockrate is limited by how fast you can switch the electrodes back and forth.  Of course, a true overclocker does everything manually.  By my estimate, with practice, a 3-4 Hz increase could be realistic over short periods of time and increased stability should come with experience.  I would suggest a large fan, as well as some water cooling for yourself, however, I doubt 24/7 stability is possible, regardless of the cooling method used.  On the plus side, a 3 Hz increase over 0 Hz is technically an increase of infinite percent. The limit of (3/X) as x approaches zero from the right equals infinity.  Just don't approach from the left. In that case you would have a decrease of negative infinite percent, and if left that way for too long, risks contributing to an earlier heat death of the universe.

 

note: its been over a decade since calculus, math may be a little rusty.

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Why not start by at least telling us what processor it is.  You could be overclocking a potato for all we know.

 

potatos produce direct current... due to the lack of alternating voltage, overclocking is unlikely.

 

Now, if all you want to do is produce alternating current from a potato battery (or any dc source), your clockrate is limited by how fast you can switch the electrodes back and forth.  Of course, a true overclocker does everything manually.  By my estimate, with practice, a 3-4 Hz increase could be realistic over short periods of time and increased stability should come with experience.  I would suggest a large fan, as well as some water cooling for yourself, however, I doubt 24/7 stability is possible, regardless of the cooling method used.  On the plus side, a 3 Hz increase over 0 Hz is technically an increase of infinite percent. The limit of (3/X) as x approaches zero from the right equals infinity.  Just don't approach from the left. In that case you would have a decrease of negative infinite percent, and if left that way for too long, risks contributing to an earlier heat death of the universe.

 

note: its been over a decade since calculus, math may be a little rusty.

+Infinity

Edited by GabrielTessin

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Why not start by at least telling us what processor it is.  You could be overclocking a potato for all we know.

 

potatos produce direct current... due to the lack of alternating voltage, overclocking is unlikely.

 

Now, if all you want to do is produce alternating current from a potato battery (or any dc source), your clockrate is limited by how fast you can switch the electrodes back and forth.  Of course, a true overclocker does everything manually.  By my estimate, with practice, a 3-4 Hz increase could be realistic over short periods of time and increased stability should come with experience.  I would suggest a large fan, as well as some water cooling for yourself, however, I doubt 24/7 stability is possible, regardless of the cooling method used.  On the plus side, a 3 Hz increase over 0 Hz is technically an increase of infinite percent. The limit of (3/X) as x approaches zero from the right equals infinity.  Just don't approach from the left. In that case you would have a decrease of negative infinite percent, and if left that way for too long, risks contributing to an earlier heat death of the universe.

 

note: its been over a decade since calculus, math may be a little rusty.

 

You, Sir, are a genius. lol

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Why not start by at least telling us what processor it is.  You could be overclocking a potato for all we know.

 

potatos produce direct current... due to the lack of alternating voltage, overclocking is unlikely.

 

Now, if all you want to do is produce alternating current from a potato battery (or any dc source), your clockrate is limited by how fast you can switch the electrodes back and forth.  Of course, a true overclocker does everything manually.  By my estimate, with practice, a 3-4 Hz increase could be realistic over short periods of time and increased stability should come with experience.  I would suggest a large fan, as well as some water cooling for yourself, however, I doubt 24/7 stability is possible, regardless of the cooling method used.  On the plus side, a 3 Hz increase over 0 Hz is technically an increase of infinite percent. The limit of (3/X) as x approaches zero from the right equals infinity.  Just don't approach from the left. In that case you would have a decrease of negative infinite percent, and if left that way for too long, risks contributing to an earlier heat death of the universe.

 

note: its been over a decade since calculus, math may be a little rusty.

 

 

Which end of the potato will be positive (+) ?

Also I am doing a research project and I need to know what a fox says?

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