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My_Inner_Fred

Looking for a new modem and router!

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Hey guys my current modem router combo was provided by my ISP(Windstream not a good company). Its started to drop connection and not work even when connected via wire, so I'm looking for a new modem and router. 

Is it better to go with a wireless modem combo? Or a separate two box set up?(Modem + Wireless Router)

What do you guys recommend? I'm looking for something thats DD-WRT compatible if possible. I <3 custom firmware. 

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First make sure your ISP allows you to supply your own modem (some do, some don't).

Personally, I recommend have separate modem and router. Part of the reason for this also stems from most ISPs only "allowing" a fixed amount of computers/devices connected at once. With a separate modem they only see one thing connected, the router.

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I also recommend dedicated modem and dedicated router.

 

Have you set a budget?

 

Do you need ADSL or Cable modem?

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Go with seperate modem and router for reasons given above, but if you have to use the isp's modem just get your own wireless router, that way even if you change isp server the router will still be useable.But remember a wireless connection is only as good as your isp's speed so if it's slow your connection won't be great.

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Go with seperate modem and router for reasons given above, but if you have to use the isp's modem just get your own wireless router, that way even if you change isp server the router will still be useable.But remember a wireless connection is only as good as your isp's speed so if it's slow your connection won't be great.

Actually, the speed of the ISP has nothing to do with  Wi-Fi speed.

Wi-Fi supports varying levels of performance depending on which technology standards it supports. Each Wi-Fi standard is rated according to its maximum theoretical network bandwidth.

 

The performance of Wi-Fi networks practically never approach these theoretical maximums. 802.11b networks, for example, generally operate no faster than about 50% of theoretical peak, around 5.5 Mbps. Likewise, 802.11a and 802.11g networks generally run no faster than 20 Mbps. And even though 802.11n rates at 300 Mbps compared to wired Fast Ethernet at 100 Mbps, the Ethernet connection can often outperform 802.11n in real world usage.

 

The disparity between theoretical and practical Wi-Fi performance comes from network protocol overhead, radio interference, physical obstructions on the line of sight between devices, and distance between devices. In addition, as more devices communicate on the network simultaneously, its performance will also decrease.

 

There us also dynamic rate scaling. When a device initially connects to a network via Wi-Fi, its rated speed is calculated according to the current signal quality of the connection. The rated connection speed then automatically changes over time if necessary to maintain a reliable link between the devices. Wi-Fi dynamic rate scaling extends the range at which wireless devices can connect to each other in return for lower network performance at the longer distances.

 

Bottom line is, until the next-generation 802.11ac, Wi0Fi standard gets here with it's expected 1 Gbps (1000 Mbps) speed. You're kinda stuck with what"s available now.

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I see... that make sense. Any recommendations on what modem and what router to get?

Budgets around $100. I require a ADSL modem. 

 

EDIT: forgot to mention the ISP I use is Windstream

Edited by My_Inner_Fred

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kyfire, on 18 Dec 2013 - 3:15 PM, said:

 

SpikeSoprano, on 18 Dec 2013 - 3:08 PM, said:

Go with seperate modem and router for reasons given above, but if you have to use the isp's modem just get your own wireless router, that way even if you change isp server the router will still be useable.But remember a wireless connection is only as good as your isp's speed so if it's slow your connection won't be great.

Actually, the speed of the ISP has nothing to do with  Wi-Fi speed.

Wi-Fi supports varying levels of performance depending on which technology standards it supports. Each Wi-Fi standard is rated according to its maximum theoretical network bandwidth.

 

The performance of Wi-Fi networks practically never approach these theoretical maximums. 802.11b networks, for example, generally operate no faster than about 50% of theoretical peak, around 5.5 Mbps. Likewise, 802.11a and 802.11g networks generally run no faster than 20 Mbps. And even though 802.11n rates at 300 Mbps compared to wired Fast Ethernet at 100 Mbps, the Ethernet connection can often outperform 802.11n in real world usage.

 

The disparity between theoretical and practical Wi-Fi performance comes from network protocol overhead, radio interference, physical obstructions on the line of sight between devices, and distance between devices. In addition, as more devices communicate on the network simultaneously, its performance will also decrease.

 

There us also dynamic rate scaling. When a device initially connects to a network via Wi-Fi, its rated speed is calculated according to the current signal quality of the connection. The rated connection speed then automatically changes over time if necessary to maintain a reliable link between the devices. Wi-Fi dynamic rate scaling extends the range at which wireless devices can connect to each other in return for lower network performance at the longer distances.

 

Bottom line is, until the next-generation 802.11ac, Wi0Fi standard gets here with it's expected 1 Gbps (1000 Mbps) speed. You're kinda stuck with what"s available now.

 

Well from experience before I upgraded to a faster download speed I could not stream movies via my wireless router, now that I have a faster connection I have no problem, so in mho the speed you get from your isp dose make a difference, at least in my case it did. :teehee:

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I see... that make sense. Any recommendations on what modem and what router to get?

 

Budgets around $100. I require a ADSL modem. 

 

EDIT: forgot to mention the ISP I use is Windstream

 

$100 for both?  Or $100 each?

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I see... that make sense. Any recommendations on what modem and what router to get?

 

Budgets around $100. I require a ADSL modem. 

 

EDIT: forgot to mention the ISP I use is Windstream

 

$100 for both?  Or $100 each?

 

Update: Seems like I have a old modem thats still operational so $100 for wireless router.

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