Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello Overclockers!

 

I am researching high-performance cooling systems for electronics and was wondering if y'all had any suggestions for new cooling technologies that our team could investigate for a thermal engineering design project.  Right now it seems like there are a million ways that we could go; multi-phase cooling, micro-refrigeration, fanless/pumpless cooling, chip-integrated cooing, something with contact resistances, something with heat sink geometry.  

 

What do you think will be the next big thing?

 

 

PS. This is for an engineering senior design project for university

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could do something with Mineral Oil and try to integrate some radiators and stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could.. But to a certain extent that's been done before.   Submerged cooling is pretty cool though.   What about encapsulated cooling for personal computing?  Is that something that has been done before?  (Icetope does encapsulated cooling for servers if you want to read up on it).

 

http://www.iceotope.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) -based thermal control technology, is the future cooling that will be used for microprocessors,.. come up with a micro-fabrication technique to place the technology on circuit cards,.. or scaling it to the chip level,.. and you will be a vary wealthy man. 

Edited by Braegnok

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds similar to chip-integrated cooling (microchannels manufactured into the chip geometry in which fluid would flow).  Could you explain what role you think the electrical-to-kinetic energy change in EHD would play in chip cooling?

 

Is it the manufacture of the microchannels that is the major cost-barrier for this technology?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EHD is currently only in the experimental & research stages,.. there are no moving parts the coolant is pumped through tiny ducts inside a thermal cold plate using electric fields,.. the next step is scaling it to the chip level.

 

http://www.manufacturing.net/news/2011/06/electrohydrodynamic-ehd-based-thermal-control-the-technology-promises-to-make-it-easier-and-more-efficient-to-remove-heat-from-small-spaces

Edited by Braegnok

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EHD is currently only in the experimental & research stages,.. there are no moving parts the coolant is pumped through tiny ducts inside a thermal cold plate using electric fields,.. the next step is scaling it to the chip level.

 

http://www.manufacturing.net/news/2011/06/electrohydrodynamic-ehd-based-thermal-control-the-technology-promises-to-make-it-easier-and-more-efficient-to-remove-heat-from-small-spaces

 

That is very cool!  I will have to discuss this with a few of my professors.  

 

 

Why not just 'cool' the electricity before it hits the chip?

 

JJ

 

The heat generated by a processor is due to inefficiency of the chip, or energy lost to resistance within the processor.  Unless we are talking about ideal conductors there will always be waste heat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the neatest rigs I ever saw was a massive liquid cooling system that actually had tubing leave the house and go down a well outside, dropped about 30 feet into the well water. In the water he coiled the tubing so he needed no radiator or fan, the natural cooling was enough. System was dead silent as he had the larger pump he needed actually outside at the well. Massive overkill but super cool, pun intended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...