Jump to content
Comp Dude2

Computer not starting, not even a beep

Recommended Posts

Hi all!

 

I'm posting here because it might be PSU related. Essentially I came back to the computer in my sig, press the power button and there is nothing. No beep, no fans, no LEDs, just silence. So I've changed the power lead for one that I know is working, removed all of the hard drives and then removed the graphics card. It still does nothing. I even checked the powerbutton connection to the motherboard. Also the LEDs in my mouse do not light so the USB supply is off too (normally it is always on when the Bonnier is off)

 

So, do I just buy a new PSU or something? It's an old computer and I changed the psu about two years ago when the original blew. The new one is a corsair stealth 600w.

 

I'd appreciate any debug ideas since the lack of any life makes it difficult to point to one thing.

 

Cheers guys!

Edited by Comp Dude2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unplug power supply from wall socket

Disconnect all power leads to motherboard and other peripherals

Use a paper clip or wire to jumper one of the black ground wires and the green wire in the 24-pin ATX connector.  You can use any of the black ground wires to the left or the right of the green "psu power on" wire.

Now plug the power supply back into the wall socket (and if the power supply has an on/off switch move it to the on position)

If the power supply fires up it's not completely dead - but that doesn't necessarily mean the power supply is good either.  It only tells you whether it will power up or not.

 

 

 

psu.atx.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply. I just tried that and the PSU fan runs and it also ran one of the system fans so it appears to be working, although not necessarily good as you say. I don't have a scope to watch the rails for anything strange so can't tell you more than that. 

 

Does this point to some motherboard/cpu failure? I has been overclocked and overvolted  (1.325V --> 1.365V) for >5 years so maybe it just went pop? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a digital multi-meter you can check the voltage of the power supply rails.

 

Do exactly as you did before, but this time before you turn the power supply off check the 12v, 5v and 3.3v rails to make sure they are within spec. (+/- 5% of nominal).

 

Let me know the results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a similar problem when I was upgrading. I think the psu cant supply the required amount of current for the computer to power on thats why its only spinning one of the system fans. Try running the mobo and cpu on another psu; if it runs, its the psu otherwise...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your idle voltage looks ok, unfortunately that doesn't tell us much about what is happening when the power supply is operating under load, or under the high stress conditions of a cold boot.

 

Since the power supply is probably the easiest to swap out (and potentially least expensive) I'd start with that.

 

If it's the Hiper in your signature................. that would have been out of my own system a long time ago  :)

 

No insult meant, just stating fact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to offend you, but...did you make sure the motherboard I/O are on right or plugged in? I've done this myself a number of time and it's the first thing i check when a computer doesn't turn on. It could have become unplugged or connected wrong. Your psu seems to work so thats all I can think of why it does not turn on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions but I'm certain the connections are correct because it had been working for months and then just stopped. I've inspected the connections now as part of my debug.

 

The Hiper PSU is gone, it blew up. So I now have a 600w OCZ which is two years old.

 

Hmm...motherboard?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have another power supply (or borrow a friends or family members) you could use that to test the system before investing in a new PSU...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...