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sonic_agamemnon

HAF XB Server - Dual Xeon Sandy Bridge-EP LGA 2011

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Looks like a nice build!

Not so sure on the case, but to each his own!

 

Be interested to see how quiet this set-up is when finished under full load!

 

With all this RAID 0 going on, have you got any plans for backups? Not just against disk failure, but also controller trouble.

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With all this RAID 0 going on, have you got any plans for backups? Not just against disk failure, but also controller trouble.

:withstupid:  WIth the work it sounds like you will be doing, you do not want to lose any data.  With six drives, the chances of one failing are high.  Not to mention you will be putting them in a RAID 0 configuration, which effectively doubles the chances of data loss from drive failure.  

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tronMomentus.png

 

 

 

Why do peoople do this?     Not trying to pick on you but I see a lot of people do this when displaying new parts for their build.

 

"An antistatic bag is a bag used for shipping (usually electronic) components, which are prone to damage caused by electrostatic discharge.

These bags are usually plastic (PET) and have a distinctive color (silvery for metallised film, pink or black for polyethylene). The polyethylene variant may also take the form of foam or bubble wrap, either as sheets or bags. Because of the need for protection against mechanical damage as well as electrostatic damage, layers of protection are often used; because of this, a protected device can be packaged inside a metalized PET film bag, which is packed inside a pink polyethylene bubble-wrap bag, which is finally packed inside a rigid black polyethylene box lined with pink poly foam.

To create the anti-static effect, the black or silver bags are slightly conductive, forming a Faraday cage around the item to be protected and preventing any localized charges from being deposited onto the protected devices as the bags are handled."

 

quoted from wikipedia

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With all this RAID 0 going on, have you got any plans for backups? Not just against disk failure, but also controller trouble.

:withstupid:  WIth the work it sounds like you will be doing, you do not want to lose any data.  With six drives, the chances of one failing are high.  Not to mention you will be putting them in a RAID 0 configuration, which effectively doubles the chances of data loss from drive failure.  

 

 

Data is backed-up to remote storage over the network overnight, meaning the main risk will be loosing a day's worth of work if a drive fails prior to the nightly back-up.  This is an acceptable trade-off for me, since this is a local development sandbox server (not production).  I'd rather have the speed and accept the risk.  It would be great if there was room and budget for a much larger box with lots of mirrored drives and less need for frequent network back-ups, but such is not the case...

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tronMomentus.png

 

 

 

Why do peoople do this?     Not trying to pick on you but I see a lot of people do this when displaying new parts for their build.

 

quoted from wikipedia

 

 

Why?

 

Because they don't know (like me) the shipping bag is so very dangerous....

Edited by sonic_agamemnon

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64GB of replacement DRAM arrived today: eight sticks of Samsung 8GB DDR3 1600 MHz ECC Registered Server Memory (M393B1K70DH0-CK0). The two Kingston 16GB DRAM modules were exchanged for this Samsung memory, since the Kingston sticks were not on the SuperMicro compatibility list. Also, further investigation indicated the Xeon 2600 series memory controller operates at maximum bandwidth only when four channels are populated. Moreover, moving from 32GB to 64GB allows each UNIX VM more room for larger JVM heaps, and should allow all four VMs to remain alive and responsive even while video tasks are running as well.



tronSamsung64GB.png

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The slowest boat from China has finally arrived with two USB v3 PCIE adapters that provide a total of 4 external ports and two 20-pin internal jacks to satisfy all on-board USB 3 requirements. Unfortunately, the SuperMicro mainboard only provides USB v2 ports.



tronUSB3.png

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So it's not really a 3.0 card if it makes you use the boards USB 3 port. Maybe that 20pin is for a extra set of USB 3 ports

Edited by hornybluecow

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So it's not really a 3.0 card if it makes you use the boards USB 3 port. Maybe that 20pin is for a extra set of USB 3 ports

 

I thought those cards generate both 3.0s and 2.0s? But in order to utilise the 3.0s, you'd need to connect a separate USB 3.0 header onto the board (those that comes with cases these days)

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So it's not really a 3.0 card if it makes you use the boards USB 3 port. Maybe that 20pin is for a extra set of USB 3 ports

 

I thought those cards generate both 3.0s and 2.0s? But in order to utilise the 3.0s, you'd need to connect a separate USB 3.0 header onto the board (those that comes with cases these days)

 

 

I selected these cards because all ports are active, both external ports and the 20-pin internal connection.  One internal connection supports the HAF XB case USB 3 inputs on the front panel, and the other connection is for the multi-card reader in the upper-front 5.25" bay.

 

One downside to this board is the need for extra power (4-pin) to drive all the external/internal connections, but I'd rather deal with that than some other USB 3 adapters which force you to decided whether to use the external or internal connections, since both cannot be active at the same time.

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One of the finest aspects of the HAF XB is its flexibility and total accessibility, a direct byproduct of its test-bench design origin. Need to remove the top or both sides? No problem. Need to remove the motherboard? No problem. On the other hand, after gaining quick access to the guts a nasty reminder just how cramped the quarters are becomes the main impression. Space it tight, making cable management even tougher than normal.


In order to cleanly install all four Seagate hybrid drives, the Enermax power supply was nudged halfway out for better clearance and easier access behind the 2.5" drive cage:




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Thankfully, cable management in the lower compartment is complete at this point; hopefully, both 80mm Noctua fans will perform well and provide sufficient airflow in the bottom chamber:





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