Jump to content
Onion

For those of you worried about college being difficult...

Recommended Posts

This is one of the reasons that I'm so happy RIT requires five quarters worth of co-ops for the engineering program. I was able to graduate with a degree and had nearly two years of work experience relevant to my major. The work I did at the second company I co-oped at helped me to get the job I am in now.

 

And I would be willing to bet you learned a lot more on the job than in the classroom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I would be willing to bet you learned a lot more on the job than in the classroom.

 

It definitely allowed me to see how a lot of classes fit together. The hands on experience was also better than just learning the theory of things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we are pretty fortunate here in Australia. For Australian citizens, the tertiary education system works on something called HECS-HELP. This is a government run, interest free, loan program which pays for ALL your uni fees.

Eventually you end up paying off your loan bit by bit through the tax system, but that's only after you begin earning 49+ grad a year. The more you earn the more they take out and if you die no on has to pay the debt - they simply cancel it.

USA sounds a lot more difficult. How do you guys pay your fees? Scholarships? Crazy savings?

 

We also had the same thing happen here for Bachelor of Electrical & Electronic Engineering students - they made the first year classes pretty difficult and the workload quite heavy in order to weed out the uncommitted. We had a pleasant surprise when our contact hours halved in second year haha.

 

Seriously though - classes are gonna be easy if you're taking easy classes. Once you get into the hard stuff (IE: real physics) that'll be the real test.

By real physics, do you mean Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetism etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we are pretty fortunate here in Australia. For Australian citizens, the tertiary education system works on something called HECS-HELP. This is a government run, interest free, loan program which pays for ALL your uni fees.

Eventually you end up paying off your loan bit by bit through the tax system, but that's only after you begin earning 49+ grad a year. The more you earn the more they take out and if you die no on has to pay the debt - they simply cancel it.

USA sounds a lot more difficult. How do you guys pay your fees? Scholarships? Crazy savings?

 

We also had the same thing happen here for Bachelor of Electrical & Electronic Engineering students - they made the first year classes pretty difficult and the workload quite heavy in order to weed out the uncommitted. We had a pleasant surprise when our contact hours halved in second year haha.

 

 

By real physics, do you mean Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetism etc?

I got to go to college for free because my dad works there. That's not how it works everywhere in the US, but in some places it is.

Here we (including me if I wanted to go to a different university or get a higher degree) pay either out of pocket, take out student loans, get scholarships, and sometimes the government gives you mean too. Not every scholarship is a full scholarship, but every little bit helps.

I wouldn't say this system is more difficult than just making everyone pay for it in taxes (or is the tax only paid by those who want to college, in which case it's essentially a government-based student loan) because while we may need to pay for it faster, at this point the decision to go was either made by our parents, who have saved up a college fund for us to at least help with costs, or we make the decision and work for it ourselves and/or work for scholarships to cover costs. Also, is it all of your universities that are paid for that way, or do you have some private universities who you do need to pay for in a similar way to us? Part of why I ask is that while I did go to a state university and am quite happy with that education, I know there are several schools that charge more but have a much better education, in part because they can charge more to then pay for better facilities and acquire better staff. We had some great staff at my school though, don't get me wrong, but we don't have the facilities like those at Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, and those facilities and schools then also bring in more great faculty. My school was good, but those schools (depending on the major) are great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we are pretty fortunate here in Australia. For Australian citizens, the tertiary education system works on something called HECS-HELP. This is a government run, interest free, loan program which pays for ALL your uni fees.

Eventually you end up paying off your loan bit by bit through the tax system, but that's only after you begin earning 49+ grad a year. The more you earn the more they take out and if you die no on has to pay the debt - they simply cancel it.

USA sounds a lot more difficult. How do you guys pay your fees? Scholarships? Crazy savings?

We can apply for student aid, but the money is split up into subsidized and unsubsidized. The unsubsidized acquires interest. Also private loans up the butt. I'm going to be about 100K in debt when I graduate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or if you're in my boat and barely scrape enough to get by, the Pell Grant gives you $2,750 per semester to put towards books and tuition for a full time student. So far it's covered everything for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×