Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ir_cow

HDR Test Image

Recommended Posts

I was trying out new cameras out over the week because I'm looking into getting a Canon Mark II. Going from 8MP to 21MP is going to be sweat and to get my feet wet before buying something very expensive I used a co-workers Canon T2i 18MP for a HDR night photo. It didn't turn so well, mainly because I was being rushed, after climbing a side of a mountain he didn't want to sit around and enjoy the night.

 

So my HDR image is flawed from the start because many of my exposures are blurred which is the whole facet of a HDR image. I did the best I could and the final image was 3.8GB with 160 photos / 19 HDR images stitched together. I think next time I'll use the Gigapan and go up on my own....

 

Below is a small selection of the photo

Edit: It's down scaled a lot for the web but it's still large.

TEST3.jpg

Edited by hornybluecow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah, that what you get when you are forced to rush and used a cheap tri-pod. since the full size is about 10 feet i'm sure if i downscale it to 18x24 the blur is will less noticeable

 

Edit: scaled down comes out to be 24x4inchs @ 600PPI. I think the ratio is to blame, panorama aren't meant to be small.

Edited by hornybluecow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you do a HDR image? What shots do you need to take with the Camera?

 

I have an EOS 500D and always wanted to try a HDR.

 

IS there a bit of software you use at the end to build the image?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wrote this a bit ago,

 

HDR (High Dynamic Range)

 

HDR is commonly referred to as a file type but is actually the outcome of a photograph that has been captured multiple times at different (up to 9) F-stops and complied into one picture.

 

Once the images are combined the user can work in native 32bit/channel and tone map the image. After editing is complete the user must convert to 8 or 16 channel format to be saved in a viewable format outside the editing program.

 

Basically you take a picture at the correct exposure for the scene you are doing and than go up and down a few F-stops to get a wider range of highlights and shadows. After you have all your shots you use some sort of HDR software.I use Photoshop / Nik HDR and most HDR software is about $100 but i'm sure you can get free ones (not not sure if GIMP has a HDR option). whatever software you use will compile all the images together and give you a HDR image. Than you can change the values to fit your needs and come out with a image similar to mine (just without the blur).

 

I suggest you do 1 shot in the day first before you try a panorama or a night one. so go outside midday and shoot at some good settings (let's say F20 ,ISO 200, 500th/s) than do another shot at F18 and F22 and you will have the base for a HDR photo. You need at lest 3 to make a HDR image. Also make sure you shoot in RAW format, otherwise whats the point, most of your data is lost already in a JPEG.

Edited by hornybluecow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...