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Prunes

Request: Info about RAM

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I was wondering, if someone here were kind enough to write an explanation to what RAM timings and frequency really mean and what it affects and such. I know that high frequency and low timings are awesome. I just don't know why they are nice to have.

 

Also, what is the right way to overclock? What tools to use to check your RAM OC?

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I guess it was a mix of momentary laziness and because it'd be nice to have as a sticky for reference and for the newcomers. Though it was mostly due to laziness. I'll just :google: it :)

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The write up at Ana is well researched and delivered, but honestly way above the technical expertise or even attention span of most of us (me included). In all my readings it is probably one of the most thorough. A simpler layman's explanation can be found here;

http://www.techpower...icle.php?id=131

 

I've searched high and low for an article published by EVA2000 over at i4Memory. It was written a few years back but was the perfect combination of theory, application and practice. For the world of me I can't find the link anymore :(

 

More importantly ECO is that just about every modern motherboard and memory module is capable of self setting those secondary and deeper timings to the correct values for stability and performance via the spd eeprom on the memory itself and the well engineered bios' of a good motherboard manufacture.

 

In most situations the only memory values you need concern yourself with are the four primary timings, dram voltage, command rate and in some cases minor tweaking of the tRD and tRFC settings. Other than that you should leave everything else alone unless you're a memory guru.

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