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RTriggerHappy

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Hi guys, my name's Ant and I've just signed up here, I've been a long time member of another site owned by Neo Era; Neoseeker.

 

I'm looking to be buying myself a new gaming computer in the next few months (when I've saved up enough money) and I thought it'd probably be better off building my own system rather than buying a stock system.

 

I've heard a little about overclocking and such and I wanted to find out more, because other than making the processor run faster than intended through forcing electricity through it (This is my understanding of overclocking anyway) and I'm wondering if overclocking is something gaming PCs benefit from?

 

I know how to put a computer together, I just don't know about specs and such. I've had a brief read of some guides here and whilst they help I can't help but feel lost in the technical jargon etc. I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction; will overclocking benefit a gaming PC? Is it important to have one very good component ie. a very good processor then standard graphics card etc, or is it better to have the best of everything? I want to get into building my own computers and I have the base knowledge but I don't want to buy loads of components only to find out they don't work together etc..

 

Thanks Guys,

Ant

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Before we help you out you should let us know what your budget is and what you will be using your computer for. I can see you're into gaming, but what kind of games are you into? (FPS, RTS, MMORPG, etc.) Are you playing the newest games or are you playing older games?

 

And will you be using this for anything other than games? Like video rendering, photoshop, auto cad ...or minimal stuff like web surfing/e-mail.

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Welcome To OCC ! :cheers:

 

I know how to put a computer together, I just don't know about specs and such. I've had a brief read of some guides here and whilst they help I can't help but feel lost in the technical jargon etc. I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction; will overclocking benefit a gaming PC? Is it important to have one very good component ie. a very good processor then standard graphics card etc, or is it better to have the best of everything? I want to get into building my own computers and I have the base knowledge but I don't want to buy loads of components only to find out they don't work together etc..

 

Thanks Guys,

Ant

 

Just to help you with the latter part of your post. I don't know much about overclocking in terms of trying it out myself, considering that I have only read about them. Though, I do plan on trying to overclock myself. That aside, when it comes to gaming, you'll want to get the best graphics card or GPU that your money can buy, as well as a nice PSU to go along with that power hungry card of yours. In choosing a processor, you'd want something that won't bottle-neck your system but still, would give you the best performance out there for your budget. Basically, in terms of gaming, you'll want a well-rounded set-up that won't bottle-neck your GPU and have a little room for upgrades in the near future without having to drastically change most parts of your build. Also, keep in mind that motherboards aren't just POS. They're useful and they have features and a good motherboard could help you get the best overclock out of your processor.

 

Also, if you're planning to build the system by April or May, I'd recommend going for the AMD 7xxx series or Nvidia 6xx series and getting an Ivybridge processor.

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I'm looking to be buying myself a new gaming computer in the next few months (when I've saved up enough money) and I thought it'd probably be better off building my own system rather than buying a stock system.

 

Welcome aboard, building a PC can be very rewarding and just down right fun.

 

I've heard a little about overclocking and such and I wanted to find out more, because other than making the processor run faster than intended through forcing electricity through it (This is my understanding of overclocking anyway) and I'm wondering if overclocking is something gaming PCs benefit from?

 

Well technically anything can benefit from overclocking since overclocking does increase the performance of the component in question. For a first time building I would not suggest building a system based on overclocking. Build toward the stock settings giving you the experience you are looking for and then use overclocking as a free boost. Make it an optional side benefit.

 

I know how to put a computer together, I just don't know about specs and such. I've had a brief read of some guides here and whilst they help I can't help but feel lost in the technical jargon etc. I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction; will overclocking benefit a gaming PC? Is it important to have one very good component ie. a very good processor then standard graphics card etc, or is it better to have the best of everything? I want to get into building my own computers and I have the base knowledge but I don't want to buy loads of components only to find out they don't work together etc..

 

Thanks Guys,

Ant

 

There are a lot of factors to answering these questions. First it would be really helpful to know what kind of games you play. An RTS or RPG player will have different results with the same components as an FPS gamer. I would also look for a balanced system, buying an uber part for one component and then cheaper parts elsewhere will make the experience less enjoyable in the long run. The good news is with the current PC components on the market you can really go middle of the road in pricing and get a great system. So tell us what games you are wanting to play, what size monitor you are wanting to use and your budget, we will jump in and give you some suggestions to maximize your build to your goals.

Edited by ComputerEd

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in the beginning of april intel will release a new processor platform and both amd and nvidia will have released their new graphic card series, so there is no point in recommending parts right now

 

As for overclocking helping there is a definite yes! most computers we recommend can save literally hundreds of dollars by overclocking instead of buying more high end parts (though intel has been locking their cheap cpus lately). For example a 200$ 2500K overclocked to 4.5GHz, with a after market cooler for 30-40$, will easily outperform a 2700K or perhaps even a 3930K that cost between 300-600$, that is at least 60-360$ woth of savings if that is the performance you needed

 

Graphic cards are not as easy to overclock as much but a overclocked 560ti performs close to a 570, and overclocking a 570 comes close to a 580 and so on... Some amd cards are actually even unlockable to the top card (6950 -> 6970) so you get an equal card to a top performer just by using software

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Thanks for the responses guys!

 

I'm looking probably to play more RPG and RTS games on there, as I'll probably stick to my Xbox for FPS games. Ideally I want to run Minecraft on the highest spec, and play games like Skyrim and Command & Conquer. I'd also want my build to be able to record games as I play (using fraps or other software/hardware) as I'd like to try produce some stuff for YouTube etc.

 

In terms of other applications I'm an apprentice web developer, so it'd need to be able to use Dreamweaver etc, but not really run any amazing imaging software as I'm more of a coder than designer. - That's pretty much it really, I'm going to have a few HDMI ports and possibly run two screens simultaneously (this is a must for when I'm coding!)

 

For budget and timescale, I figured that I can save £200/month (~$308.72) as of March, from now until then I'm saving up for a £400 42" TV. That's the most I can save a month, but all depending on what suggestions you guys make I'm willing to wait until ~October to save up. If I'm getting a PC I'm making it worthwhile; until then I'll continue to use my useless laptop. I won't need to budget for my setup as I'll be able to run it on my TV via HDMI and I'll just get a small monitor for my second screen. My overall budget is probably around £1,400 at the most. But if you guys think I can do it for less then of course I will..

 

In regards to where I'll be buying we have a local computer fair, so I can check that out, or I was looking at ebuyer.com?..

Edited by RTriggerHappy

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I suggest you hold on to the money and wait until May. It's not that good to build computers right now, especially since a lot of new stuff are going to be released every month and you'd want to wait and see what they are capable of. Since you want your computer to last, you'd want to buy it the smart way and that is, to learn from reviews and the mistake of others. With your budget, you could build a good gaming rig that could last you for 3-4 years at most before you begin to feel that it won't be able to run games at max settings.

 

Don't worry, people here will be more than willing enough to help you get the most out of your money. :thumbsup:

 

P.S - With that large TV of yours, It's safe to say that majority of your budget will go directly to buying a powerful GPU and a very good power supply. :D

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Thanks for the responses guys!

 

I'm looking probably to play more RPG and RTS games on there, as I'll probably stick to my Xbox for FPS games. Ideally I want to run Minecraft on the highest spec, and play games like Skyrim and Command & Conquer. I'd also want my build to be able to record games as I play (using fraps or other software/hardware) as I'd like to try produce some stuff for YouTube etc.

 

In terms of other applications I'm an apprentice web developer, so it'd need to be able to use Dreamweaver etc, but not really run any amazing imaging software as I'm more of a coder than designer. - That's pretty much it really, I'm going to have a few HDMI ports and possibly run two screens simultaneously (this is a must for when I'm coding!)

 

For budget and timescale, I figured that I can save £200/month (~$308.72) as of March, from now until then I'm saving up for a £400 42" TV. That's the most I can save a month, but all depending on what suggestions you guys make I'm willing to wait until ~October to save up. If I'm getting a PC I'm making it worthwhile; until then I'll continue to use my useless laptop. I won't need to budget for my setup as I'll be able to run it on my TV via HDMI and I'll just get a small monitor for my second screen. My overall budget is probably around £1,400 at the most. But if you guys think I can do it for less then of course I will..

 

In regards to where I'll be buying we have a local computer fair, so I can check that out, or I was looking at ebuyer.com?..

Welcome to OCC :cheers:

Now then, I'll try summarise your needs:

 

-Pack a Punch for serious gaming.

-Has enough proccessing power to reduce Lags or any similar in programs such as Dreamweaver

-Using a 2x23-24" (?) screen and possibly another 42" TV

-Budget of £1400

 

I would say go with a 2500k or even a 2600k built. But as medbor said, and since you're not thinking of getting the PC today, it'd be wise to wait and see how Intel's new Ivy Bridge would perform. Also, You would might as well wait for the Radeon 7000 series or GTX 700 series of graphics card that's bound to be released very soon.

My current Suggestion would be:

 

CPU: Intel i7 2600K (£239.30) or IB equivelant

Board: Asus P8Z68-V Pro (£149.98) or Upcoming Z77 chipset with IB

RAM: Corsair Vengeance LP 8GB CML8GX3M2A1600C9B (£41.70)

Cooler: Noctua NH-U12P SE2 (£53.99) or NZXT Havik 140 (£56.15)

Graphics: Sapphire Radeon HD 6970 FleX (£360.64) or HD 7000/GTX 700 Series

SSD: Kingston HyperX 120GB (£149.98)

Case: CoolerMaster HAF 932 Advanced (£119.95)

HDD: Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black Sata III (£107.02)

PSU: Corsair AX850 Modular 80+ Gold (£139.99)

 

That totals at about £1365...

 

Hope it give you some idea of your new PC :cheers:

Edited by vandreadstriker

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Welcome to OCC :cheers:

Now then, I'll try summarise your needs:

 

-Pack a Punch for serious gaming.

-Has enough proccessing power to reduce Lags or any similar in programs such as Dreamweaver

-Using a 2x23-24" (?) screen and possibly another 42" TV

-Budget of £1400

 

I would say go with a 2500k or even a 2600k built. But as medbor said, and since you're not thinking of getting the PC today, it'd be wise to wait and see how Intel's new Ivy Bridge would perform. Also, You would might as well wait for the Radeon 7000 series or GTX 700 series of graphics card that's bound to be released very soon.

My current Suggestion would be:

 

CPU: Intel i7 2600K (£239.30) or IB equivelant

Board: Asus P8Z68-V Pro (£149.98) or Upcoming Z77 chipset with IB

RAM: Corsair Vengeance LP 8GB CML8GX3M2A1600C9B (£41.70)

Cooler: Noctua NH-U12P SE2 (£53.99) or NZXT Havik 140 (£56.15)

Graphics: Sapphire Radeon HD 6970 FleX (£360.64) or HD 7000/GTX 700 Series

SSD: Kingston HyperX 120GB (£149.98)

Case: CoolerMaster HAF 932 Advanced (£119.95)

HDD: Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black Sata III (£107.02)

PSU: Corsair AX850 Modular 80+ Gold (£139.99)

 

That totals at about £1365...

 

Hope it give you some idea of your new PC :cheers:

Great components but the price just seems out of this world? not even crossifre for that kind of money?

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