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Tiltentei06

HHD's with raid0

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Hello OCC. I am trying to find out if i can use two WD 1,5TB each in raid 0. My motherboard manual says: A raid array over 2TB can only be set as a data disk only. Does this mean that i can only use disks in raid 0 that is up to 1TB each?

I'm not planing on using the raid 0 set up as OS disk. I simply want the transfer time when copying over to other disks reduced. I have a MB with sata 6gbs suport. Do you think using two identical in raid 0 will be nice to use when copying over large files to another set up of two disks in raid 0? Will the transfer time be reduced if i try out this?

Edited by Tiltentei06

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Hey dude. It sounds like your OS can only be installed on a 2TB disk max. but since you are making a data disk you should be able to combine two 1.5's to make a 3TB disk. Will the transfer speeds be faster than a single disk? I doubt it. If you want faster speed, get a Solid State Disk. And if you want even faster than that, get a RAM disk. The problem is the price. A 128GB SSD is $200 or more and a 128GB RAM disk is around $1000. I installed Windows 7 on two 1TB HDD's in RAID 0 and I thought it was actually slower than a single disk. I have very little faith in arrays of any kind. Two SSD's in RAID 0 is barely faster than a single SSD so I would think HDD's are probably the same. The problem with an array is if you lose a disk you might lose everything. I put everything onto a RAID 5 array, lost a disk, wasn't able to rebuild the array and so lost everything. If you lose one disk out of a RAID 0 array you lose it all. The best bet is to keep a 1-1 copy of your data. I think a RAID 0 (performance) array is somebody's idea of a bad joke. And a RAID 5 array is an even worse joke. Don't trust your data to an array because even though you might have instructions on how to rebuild it should it fail, you might find out (like I did) that it might be impossible to rebuild.

Edited by wowdoggy954

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Hey dude. It sounds like your OS can only be installed on a 2TB disk max. but since you are making a data disk you should be able to combine two 1.5's to make a 3TB disk. Will the transfer speeds be faster than a single disk? I doubt it. If you want faster speed, get a Solid State Disk. And if you want even faster than that, get a RAM disk. The problem is the price. A 128GB SSD is $200 or more and a 128GB RAM disk is around $1000. I installed Windows 7 on two 1TB HDD's in RAID 0 and I thought it was actually slower than a single disk. I have very little faith in arrays of any kind. Two SSD's in RAID 0 is barely faster than a single SSD so I would think HDD's are probably the same. The problem with an array is if you lose a disk you might lose everything. I put everything onto a RAID 5 array, lost a disk, wasn't able to rebuild the array and so lost everything. If you lose one disk out of a RAID 0 array you lose it all. The best bet is to keep a 1-1 copy of your data. I think a RAID 0 (performance) array is somebody's idea of a bad joke. And a RAID 5 array is an even worse joke. Don't trust your data to an array because even though you might have instructions on how to rebuild it should it fail, you might find out (like I did) that it might be impossible to rebuild.

RAID 1 ftw!

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Is there the option of getting a solid state drive as an OS drive or Making a raid with the solid state drives? Only reason I ask is are trying to use this for storage would be nice but you can loose your data if your not careful about it and a terabyte worth of data being lost is just something I don't want to imagin.

 

If you really want a raid with 2 disks that large then I would suggest a stand alone Raid card that stands on the expansion lanes to help its bandwith. Preferably a PCI express x4 or better as they seem to perform oustandingly.

If I could afford to do this then I would personally do this. First I would acquire one of OCZ's SSD's that operates on the PCI express expansion lanes.

 

OCZ RevoDrive OCZSSDPX-1RVD0120 PCI-E x4 MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSDOCZ RevoDrive OCZSSDPX-1RVD0120 PCI-E x4 120GB PCI Express MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

HighPoint RocketRAID 640 PCI-Express 2.0 x4 SATA III (6.0Gb/s) Controller Card I would use that for your OS and light documents for "on the fly" data access as this will be the quickest rate of travel. Then we can turn around and with your 2 1.5tb or better drives make a raid 0 to help speed movement in and out.

 

If money is not an issue then this would be the direction I would go. Hope this helps.

 

Edit: If anything else use an SSD on the motherboards on board sata ports and use the raid from a raid card such as this one And I would also look into building some stat redundancy such as a raid 1 5 or 1+0. HighPoint Rocket 620 PCI-Express 2.0 x1 SATA 6.0Gb/s Controller Card HighPoint Rocket 620 PCI-Express 2.0 x1 Low Profile Ready SATA III (6.0Gb/s) Controller Card

Edited by boinker

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Second that!

 

I'm sorry, but what? Second what? RAID 1 ftw? What does ftw mean? RAID 1 for the world? Don't you guys know how to type? Why don't you offer an explanation to the person who originally posted the question like I did? Sure, RAID 1 works good for making a 1-1 copy of something - if you happen to have an extra disk at your disposal for that purpose and if that's what the original question was about. And let's not forget that HDD's are mechanical and the more you use them, the faster they wear out. Sorry, but RAID 1 ftw has absolutely nothing to do with the original question. I was merely offering my thoughts on a RAID 0 array and arrays in general. Stay the course and elaborate.

Edited by wowdoggy954

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I'm sorry, but what? Second what? RAID 1 ftw? What does ftw mean? RAID 1 for the world? Don't you guys know how to type? Why don't you offer an explanation to the person who originally posted the question like I did? Sure, RAID 1 works good for making a 1-1 copy of something - if you happen to have an extra disk at your disposal for that purpose and if that's what the original question was about. And let's not forget that HDD's are mechanical and the more you use them, the faster they wear out. Sorry, but RAID 1 ftw has absolutely nothing to do with the original question. I was merely offering my thoughts on a RAID 0 array and arrays in general. Stay the course and elaborate.

 

 

 

:pfp:

Edited by boinker

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I strongly agree with the facepalm comment.

 

@ the OP:

First off, what are your system specs? Secondly, the answer to your question is yes- yes you can do it, and yes it will improve your file transfer speeds and times. The amount of improvement you'll see depends entirely on the type of files you generally transfer. If they are large sequential files, then your transfers will noticeably improve. If the files are mostly small and non-sequential, you wont see any improvements. The reason for that is because the Achilles heel of mechanical HDD's is their slow access times, and RAID 0 doesnt affect those at all.

 

RAID 1 is not the way for you to go, since you're clearly looking for storage space. The reason people use RAID 1 is for data redundancy- every bit of data is written twice, identically on both drives. You only get 1.5 TB of usable hard drive space even though you have 3TB of total hard drive space, and there is zero improvement in your transfer speeds. The upside is you dont lose your data due to a single hard drive failure. Conversely with RAID 0, if either one of your two drives fail, you will lose all your data from those drives. That means that you double your chance of losing everything due to a drive failure. That being said, when was the last time you experienced a hard drive failure? I have had the same mechanical hard drive RAID 0 set up for the last couple years with no problems. I currently boot from a RAID 0 made of three SSD's, and I've experienced no problems with those either. The guy talking about the uselessness of RAID 0 with SSD's had a single bad experience, but I can tell you from my own much larger pool of experience that it is indeed much much faster to use RAID 0.

 

If you decide to go with the RAID 0, let us know and I can help you with figuring out some options for backing up your data too. Hope that helped!!

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I'm sorry, but what? Second what? RAID 1 ftw? What does ftw mean? RAID 1 for the world? Don't you guys know how to type? Why don't you offer an explanation to the person who originally posted the question like I did? Sure, RAID 1 works good for making a 1-1 copy of something - if you happen to have an extra disk at your disposal for that purpose and if that's what the original question was about. And let's not forget that HDD's are mechanical and the more you use them, the faster they wear out. Sorry, but RAID 1 ftw has absolutely nothing to do with the original question. I was merely offering my thoughts on a RAID 0 array and arrays in general. Stay the course and elaborate.

 

SSD's wear out too from rewriting the flash too much...right?

Edited by Dan The Gamer

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RAID 1 is not the way for you to go, since you're clearly looking for storage space. The reason people use RAID 1 is for data redundancy- every bit of data is written twice, identically on both drives. You only get 1.5 TB of usable hard drive space even though you have 3TB of total hard drive space, and there is zero improvement in your transfer speeds. The upside is you dont lose your data due to a single hard drive failure.

 

 

doesn't the hdd's in raid one act like they are in raid 1 except slower cause it writes more to the hhd cause it isn't stripped?

 

 

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SSD's wear out, but their MTBF is something like 10 years because the controller chips inside them prevent the flash from being re-written until every cell within the drive has been written to once. Its called wear-levelling.

 

As far as the mechanical drives go, I think what you were asking was about the read speeds in RAID 1 being the same as in RAID 0? I know its not any slower to write data since it happens in parallel, and its never slower to read data either. You would think that a very smart controller would be able to read both disks in RAID 1 as if it was RAID 0, but I've never actually heard of that happening. If someone can say otherwise I'd love to hear it, but AFAIK both read and write speeds in RAID 1 are identical to the speeds you'd get if you had no RAID at all.

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