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alexonfyre

D*mn Temps

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Disagreements over the best thermal paste and application method aside.................

No matter what application method you use you shouldn't ever use a bare finger to spread the paste around. Your fingers have oil on them and the oil from your skin can contaminate

the thermal paste resulting in a slight degradation in thermal transfer properties of the TIM.

 

If you use your finger it's probably a good idea to use a plastic sandwich bag on your finger to prevent the transfer of oil or contaminants from your finger into the TIM.

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i just use a cotton ball and some alcohol to clean my finger. going on 12 years without a problem.

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If it works, that's great. I've used AS5 since it came out and I had no issues on CPU's like the Phenom II x3 720 BE, but when you start overclocking power hungry and hot CPU's like the i7 920's, the temps do get worse over time, and the TIM gets dried up quite a bit. There's also many different reviews regarding thermal compounds that will rate each TIM differently depending on setup, testing, and application methods used, and I've tried 3 different thermal compounds since moving on from AS5:

1. Arctic Cooling MX-2 Thermal Compound

2. TIM Consultants T-C Grease 0098

3. OCZ Freeze

 

From my experience, and I have quite a lot of experience, I've liked OCZ Freeze so far. Another downside of AS5 is that it carries some capacitance in it, have it come in contact with other components, there's a possibility of trouble.

 

Not only that, I read more than one review before deciding on what's out there, and I'm not always looking for the lowest temps, but a multiple of factors (capacitance, curing time, overclocked load temperature, cost per gram):

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/3383/arctic_cooling_mx_4_thermal_compound/index4.html

http://www.ocia.net/reviews/oczfreeze/page3.shtml

http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/noctua_nt_h1/5.htm

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Noctua/NT-H1/4.html

http://www.ocmodshop.com/ocmodshop.aspx?a=1628&p=4147

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=138&Itemid=1&limit=1&limitstart=5

 

Here's some interesting application methods used:

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=170&Itemid=1&limit=1&limitstart=4

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Every thermal paste has it's pro's and con's. I really like the link battery posted, because that is the one I was going to link as well. In almost EVERY OTHER REVIEW I have seen of thermal pastes, they don't actually test the makeup of the paste. They just go by the temps given.

 

Well, I hate to say it but you cannot judge by temps alone. You will NEVER have the exact same application of any kind of paste on a CPU. You can be close, but never exact. And with the CPU's now having multiple cores and needing paste everywhere, you have more chances to mess up.

 

 

Both great videos that show you what can go wrong or what can go right. I personally follow AS's instructions from here - http://www.arcticsilver.com/methods.html.

 

Anyway, back on subject. It doesn't sound like something wrong with your application method or the paste. Sounds kind of like a Mobo error if you can't even go below 1.2v on a processor that is proven to be stable at less.

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Every thermal paste has it's pro's and con's. I really like the link battery posted, because that is the one I was going to link as well. In almost EVERY OTHER REVIEW I have seen of thermal pastes, they don't actually test the makeup of the paste. They just go by the temps given.

 

Well, I hate to say it but you cannot judge by temps alone. You will NEVER have the exact same application of any kind of paste on a CPU. You can be close, but never exact. And with the CPU's now having multiple cores and needing paste everywhere, you have more chances to mess up.

 

 

Both great videos that show you what can go wrong or what can go right. I personally follow AS's instructions from here - http://www.arcticsilver.com/methods.html.

 

Anyway, back on subject. It doesn't sound like something wrong with your application method or the paste. Sounds kind of like a Mobo error if you can't even go below 1.2v on a processor that is proven to be stable at less.

Awesome videos! I like that idea of using a square piece of glass. I'll have to try that on my next application using my double lines. However, I would have liked to see him place the glass square from one edge to the other on an evenly layered application. I knew there were air bubbles if you placed the heatsink flat on top, but I heard it didn't happen if you tilted it on one edge to the other edge.

 

I am definitely going by AS's instructions my next go around instead of my twin line method. I like how they give different instructions on the type of CPU you have. Mine would be a single vertical for the i7 950, and a dot on my 1090T.

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Awesome videos! I like that idea of using a square piece of glass. I'll have to try that on my next application using my double lines. However, I would have liked to see him place the glass square from one edge to the other on an evenly layered application. I knew there were air bubbles if you placed the heatsink flat on top, but I heard it didn't happen if you tilted it on one edge to the other edge.

 

I am definitely going by AS's instructions my next go around instead of my twin line method. I like how they give different instructions on the type of CPU you have. Mine would be a single vertical for the i7 950, and a dot on my 1090T.

 

Glad I could help! And I wasn't trying to say anyone's way of applying paste was wrong, I was merely trying to point out that you need to be aware of your CPU (where the cores are) and what could go wrong with the different applications. When doing something where it is very hard to be perfect and tons could go wrong, you gotta look at every detail you can.

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Glad I could help! And I wasn't trying to say anyone's way of applying paste was wrong, I was merely trying to point out that you need to be aware of your CPU (where the cores are) and what could go wrong with the different applications. When doing something where it is very hard to be perfect and tons could go wrong, you gotta look at every detail you can.

It's much more useful than doing things through trial and error (and less time consuming). Obviously I don't have temperature issues on my systems, but if it can shave off 1-2C at max load, I'd be happy. :P

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I used the recommended method from Arctic Sliver 5 (single line) but it actually worked worse for my 930 and Contac29 cpu cooler and I gained 3-4 degrees C. This happened because of the way my cooler contacts the cpu (got 3 direct contact copper pipes), that method only allowed a small amount of coverage over the two outer pipes and thus reduced heat transfer. I then used the double line method and it's back to where it was originally (70 degrees C). So the method they suggest is a good guide but I think it also depends on the type of cooler you use as well and so their technique isn't always optimal.

Edited by Alexandre

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I used the recommended method from Arctic Sliver 5 (single line) but it actually worked worse for my 930 and Contac29 cpu cooler and I gained 3-4 degrees C. This happened because of the way my cooler contacts the cpu (got 3 direct contact copper pipes), that method only allowed a small amount of coverage over the two outer pipes and thus reduced heat transfer. I then used the double line method and it's back to where it was originally (70 degrees C). So the method they suggest is a good guide but I think it also depends on the type of cooler you use as well and so their technique isn't always optimal.

 

Very good point! I didn't even think about that.

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Direct heatpipe contact coolers are also unique in that you should put the TIM on the heatsink itself.

I saw those videos a while ago, but forgot about them. I was a personal fan of the happy face.

Watching those I will use the line method, but I have to look up which direction to go in.

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Direct heatpipe contact coolers are also unique in that you should put the TIM on the heatsink itself.

Yeah I found that to be the most effective method: Putting the TIM on the two metal plates between the 3 pipes for my cooler

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