Jump to content

Low DRAM frequency?


Recommended Posts

Hey there. I was checking my computer stats with Speccy and one thing caught my eye. Screenshot below.

To my knowledge I haven't altered memory settings. I bought that 1Gb stick some years ago. When every other part says 200MHz, I'm wondering why DRAM frequency is only 165MHz. Can it be changed to 200MHz?

 

CPU is AMD Athlon 64 3200+

FSB latency is 210MHz <- tweaked from 200MHz

 

frequency.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never used "speccy". What's CPUz say in the memory tab?

 

You can also check your BIOS. You'll want a 1:1 FSB to RAM ratio.

 

Mixed memory isn't fun. You might have to loosen your timings a bit more to get everything running at DDR400

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never used "speccy". What's CPUz say in the memory tab?

 

- 165MHz and FSB:DRAM says CPU/14 ? I read that AMD Athlon 64 works differently compared to Intel processors in memory regards.

 

You can also check your BIOS. You'll want a 1:1 FSB to RAM ratio.

 

Mixed memory isn't fun. You might have to loosen your timings a bit more to get everything running at DDR400

 

- How to interpret "loosen" in this context? I'm pretty new to this. I believe PC3200 (200MHz) is the fastest this memory can go, untweaked. This computer is 5 ½ years old after all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your current timings (2.5 3 3 6) are too tight for the spec of one of the modules (3 3 3 8). To compensate, you computer lowers the frequency (probably through the multiplier).

 

I'm not sure how the chipset / processor that you're using handles multiple modules. Socket 754, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Socket 754 it is. So 3 3 3 8 would be better when DRAM latency increases to 200MHz (or 210MHz)? I've never tweaked RAM, does it produce heat or require any special voltages?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are stock specifications, so, no - it should not require any special considerations (the additional 10 MHz may or may not matter). The trouble is, even with those settings, it may not properly work. You might have to increase your chipset voltage or play with some other settings. I can't tell you what to change, so you'll just have to figure out most of those by yourself.

 

Basically, larger timings are slower (you're doing the same amount of stuff in larger amounts of clock cycles), but necessary for increased frequency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...