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Problems with temp 75c- i7 930 @ 2.8 Ghz with Corsair H50

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Ok, I just simply scanned through all the postings on this thread. I too have an H50 and just got done two weeks of trying to OC. I have the same problem. After toying around with everything involved, I was at 70c while overclocking at 3.8- 3.9 ghz. The temp was just too high.

 

I checked and research the problem again. The problem in my case was that I INSTALLED THE H50 WRONG ! I had the pump cable and fan cable mixed up and hooked up to the wrong places on the board. My pump was not getting the right power, thus lower RPM. I then went into bios and " turbo " all my fans and power to the pump. It is now at 61c when I oc it. I am not done with my system yet. Tomorrow I am going to add more fans and make the H50 a push pull system. I am hoping to get down to around 54c when OC'd.

 

You may want to check your wires and good luck.

 

Thanks for the suggestions but I checked my wires and they were plugged into the correct place. Anyway, the H50 fan and pump is on max.

 

My idle temps now are around 32c and the top exhaust fans pump out very little heat. In fact it was cold to the touch. i OCed a few times but the top fans were pumping heat out which i did not want in the summer. I will OC it when the weather gets colder.

 

One thing i did try was the H50 intake vs exhaust fan orientation.

 

The temps with the case closed were 5-7c less when the fan was drawing cold air into the case (at idle @ 2.8Mhz - 1.0v) . I guess it is obvious, but cold air will cool your H50 radiator more while hot air inside the case will not.

 

The only thing that I am concerned with is the amount of dust accumulation on the radiator. I guess vaccum cleaning once a month should do the job.

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Hey bud just to let you know I purchased a H50 from Microcenter here in Houston and I only had it for about a week because the pump went out and stopped working. My temps were like yours maybe even a little hotter and when I touched the hoses going to the radiator I almost burned my hand. When I took it back to get a refund they informed me that they have had ALOT of these coolers returned for the exact same reason so maybe thats whats wrong with yours? I wouldn't chance it. I took the H50 back and now i'm running a Thermaltake Frio air cooler that was designed for the 980x and absolutely love it. It moves ALOT of air and does a good job cooling my 860 at 4.0 24/7 stable i've even pushed it to 4.6 for running superPi. Just a thought but I hope that helps. Good luck.

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You should be careful using Prime for temperature testing - IntelBurnTest is a MUCH better program to see how hot your CPU can actually get.

 

Prime stresses harder and pushes temps further.and Intelburn is the lowest rated stress test. it does not even stress the cores 100%. LinX is the preferred test by most Intel users at 20 passes 25,000 problems.

Edited by Drdeath

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Hey bud just to let you know I purchased a H50 from Microcenter here in Houston and I only had it for about a week because the pump went out and stopped working. My temps were like yours maybe even a little hotter and when I touched the hoses going to the radiator I almost burned my hand. When I took it back to get a refund they informed me that they have had ALOT of these coolers returned for the exact same reason so maybe thats whats wrong with yours? I wouldn't chance it. I took the H50 back and now i'm running a Thermaltake Frio air cooler that was designed for the 980x and absolutely love it. It moves ALOT of air and does a good job cooling my 860 at 4.0 24/7 stable i've even pushed it to 4.6 for running superPi. Just a thought but I hope that helps. Good luck.

 

 

Thanks for the info.

 

I think my H50 is running fine now and since it has a 2 year warranty, I will consider changing it when it doesn't work.

 

I had considered other air cooling solutions but they were all massive!! In my opinion, the H50 is smaller and simplier.

 

I don't think I will push it to 4.6 until it is snowing outside and that would only be for fun!

 

As for 4.0, the core temp goes to around 70c and that with the summer heat is not nice. When I need to turn on the heater, I will push it back to 4.0.

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things to keep in mind when considering what is a good temperature:

 

1. hyper threading is part of the reason the i7 series processors run so hot. it adds nearly 25% (i think??) transistors to the core (not counting cache, etc) and WILL heat things up. disabling HT can lower temps considerably - when you are looking at someone else's temps, be sure they haven't disabled HT - a common practice when OCing these proc's

 

2. turbo boost - see number 1; same thing can occur, though the impact to temps is quite a bit less. this impacts stability more than temps, but still gets disabled by many OCers.

 

3. make sure you compare your voltages with whomever you are comparing to. my system dropped 5-8C by lowering VCore by .35V

 

4. i noticed in your original post your ambient room temp was 28. later on, your temp was 24. that 4C drop will correspond DIRECTLY to your load temps (ie: load temp will be 4C lower at 24 vs 28 room temp)

 

5. as you already noticed, reversing the rad fans to intake (rather than output) air can greatly impact your temps. when making comparisons with other rigs, make sure you know their configurations (this also includes 1 fan vs 2 - push pull)

 

from your original setup: if you reverse the fan, add a second for push/pull, check your TIM, set/lower your voltages manually vs auto, turn off hyper threading, and take all temp readings in the winter with all the windows open!! :) i bet your temperatures will drop 20C or more!! people will think you have a custom WC rig :)

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things to keep in mind when considering what is a good temperature:

 

1. hyper threading is part of the reason the i7 series processors run so hot. it adds nearly 25% (i think??) transistors to the core (not counting cache, etc) and WILL heat things up. disabling HT can lower temps considerably - when you are looking at someone else's temps, be sure they haven't disabled HT - a common practice when OCing these proc's

 

2. turbo boost - see number 1; same thing can occur, though the impact to temps is quite a bit less. this impacts stability more than temps, but still gets disabled by many OCers.

 

3. make sure you compare your voltages with whomever you are comparing to. my system dropped 5-8C by lowering VCore by .35V

 

4. i noticed in your original post your ambient room temp was 28. later on, your temp was 24. that 4C drop will correspond DIRECTLY to your load temps (ie: load temp will be 4C lower at 24 vs 28 room temp)

 

5. as you already noticed, reversing the rad fans to intake (rather than output) air can greatly impact your temps. when making comparisons with other rigs, make sure you know their configurations (this also includes 1 fan vs 2 - push pull)

 

from your original setup: if you reverse the fan, add a second for push/pull, check your TIM, set/lower your voltages manually vs auto, turn off hyper threading, and take all temp readings in the winter with all the windows open!! smile.gif i bet your temperatures will drop 20C or more!! people will think you have a custom WC rig smile.gif

 

 

This makes no sense. Hyperthreading disabled = lower performance. Keep it enabled. When overclocking DISABLE turbo.

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Prime stresses harder and pushes temps further.and Intelburn is the lowest rated stress test. it does not even stress the cores 100%. LinX is the preferred test by most Intel users at 20 passes 25,000 problems.

I'm pretty sure your dead wrong. I get 60-65c on Prime95 and I get 70-73c on Intel Burn Test

 

This makes no sense. Hyperthreading disabled = lower performance. Keep it enabled. When overclocking DISABLE turbo.

This has been proven in previous threads that Hyperthreading can reduce performance slightly and disabling it can reduce the temps by 10c. Do you know any applications that can fully utilize 8 threads? yeah not many

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things to keep in mind when considering what is a good temperature:

 

1. hyper threading is part of the reason the i7 series processors run so hot. it adds nearly 25% (i think??) transistors to the core (not counting cache, etc) and WILL heat things up. disabling HT can lower temps considerably - when you are looking at someone else's temps, be sure they haven't disabled HT - a common practice when OCing these proc's

 

2. turbo boost - see number 1; same thing can occur, though the impact to temps is quite a bit less. this impacts stability more than temps, but still gets disabled by many OCers.

 

3. make sure you compare your voltages with whomever you are comparing to. my system dropped 5-8C by lowering VCore by .35V

 

4. i noticed in your original post your ambient room temp was 28. later on, your temp was 24. that 4C drop will correspond DIRECTLY to your load temps (ie: load temp will be 4C lower at 24 vs 28 room temp)

 

5. as you already noticed, reversing the rad fans to intake (rather than output) air can greatly impact your temps. when making comparisons with other rigs, make sure you know their configurations (this also includes 1 fan vs 2 - push pull)

 

from your original setup: if you reverse the fan, add a second for push/pull, check your TIM, set/lower your voltages manually vs auto, turn off hyper threading, and take all temp readings in the winter with all the windows open!! :) i bet your temperatures will drop 20C or more!! people will think you have a custom WC rig :)

 

 

I kept everything on. I also read in various forums that HT and other new CPu technologies can increase temps. But I want to keep things on and if that limits my OC speed, so be it.

 

but thanks for the info nonetheless

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This makes no sense. Hyperthreading disabled = lower performance. Keep it enabled. When overclocking DISABLE turbo.

 

I did this already.

 

Thanks for the info

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I'm pretty sure your dead wrong. I get 60-65c on Prime95 and I get 70-73c on Intel Burn Test

 

 

This has been proven in previous threads that Hyperthreading can reduce performance slightly and disabling it can reduce the temps by 10c. Do you know any applications that can fully utilize 8 threads? yeah not many

 

Not a clue.

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note: i wasn't giving advise one way or another, i was simply offering suggestions to consider when making comparisons with another's setup. in this case, yes - turning off HT can lower performance in highly threaded aps (mostly benchmarks and encoding software from my limited experience), but it can also influence stability, and -as i said before - will greatly affect temps. i have seen more than a few articles where this was disabled when going for a high OC (when speed is more important than parallelism, or temps are critical to stability). i do two things with my PC: gaming and encoding (i'm ripping/encoding my entire DVD library with over 2000 hours worth of video). for gaming, the CPU OC never comes into play - multithreaded or not (i sit at or below 20% usage normally). for encoding, both the multithreading and the OC effect things heavily. if you don't encode, i would very much suggest turning off HT when you aren't benchmarking. it's a simple thing really to enable and disable it for bench runs. of course, professional use still uses multithreading as well (i hadn't thought of that earlier)....anyway, thats my 2 cents. take it for what it's worth.

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note: i wasn't giving advise one way or another, i was simply offering suggestions to consider when making comparisons with another's setup. in this case, yes - turning off HT can lower performance in highly threaded aps (mostly benchmarks and encoding software from my limited experience), but it can also influence stability, and -as i said before - will greatly affect temps. i have seen more than a few articles where this was disabled when going for a high OC (when speed is more important than parallelism, or temps are critical to stability). i do two things with my PC: gaming and encoding (i'm ripping/encoding my entire DVD library with over 2000 hours worth of video). for gaming, the CPU OC never comes into play - multithreaded or not (i sit at or below 20% usage normally). for encoding, both the multithreading and the OC effect things heavily. if you don't encode, i would very much suggest turning off HT when you aren't benchmarking. it's a simple thing really to enable and disable it for bench runs. of course, professional use still uses multithreading as well (i hadn't thought of that earlier)....anyway, thats my 2 cents. take it for what it's worth.

 

 

my latest OC attempt with turbo off and HT on.

 

post-70891-12806193314222_thumb.gif

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