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Queenz

How to get the best pictures on a camera?

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I suck at photography as you can see in my build log thread. I was wanting to know if you have any tips or tricks as to what I should do, and what settings to adjust on my camera to make a picture come out alot better than what I've been taking them. I don't own a DSLR camera at the moment so please no camera suggestions :)

 

For now I have the Casio Exilim EX-S10

 

BTW another thing that is a constant problem with pictures I take is that they come out really dim and dark no matter how bright the lighting is. I even try different flash settings and it makes it look like crap and the flash can been seen in the picture on the item I'm trying to capture.

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Doesn't that camera have about 100 different scene presets (Indoor, Barbeque, Party, Dinner, Breakfast, Midnight Snack, McDonald's, Tree House, etc etc) ?

 

I can't remember it having a manual mode, so I think you'd have to find a Night Portrait or Night Landscape mode, and then use a tripod, in order to get decent indoor pics with indoor lighting

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There's no substitute for pulling out the manual and going over the camera's settings. ;)

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Put your subject under decent amounts of light. If a light source is strong, have it behind the camera. Think about how to compose the shot. Don't use flash. Have a steady hand. RTFM.

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I messed with some of the settings, modes, and used a trippod and this is what I got:

 

 

CIMG1324.jpg

 

CIMG1329.jpg

 

What do you think for a noob?

 

And I don't have the manual no more

Edited by Queenz

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They look fine. For pics of static objects indoors, I'd be surprised if your auto settings aren't fine. The only thing you may have to change is switching to "macro" if you're doing an up-close shot.

 

Also, if you're doing a distance shot, be sure you don't get into digital zoom (some cameras automatically slide into digital zoom after you max out optical zoom...there would be a slight pause before it switches, but if you're not paying attention, you may not notice it). Digital zoom will severely degrade your image quality.

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Those photos are more than serviceable.

 

Remember, in low light conditions the aperture must remain open for a longer period of time to allow more light to reach the recording source (this is true whether you're doing old fashioned 35mm shots or digital shots). And the longer the aperture stays open the more suspect the resulting picture is to jitter or blur.

 

Thats why you generally use fast shutter speeds for bright light and action shots, and you use lower shutter speeds for low light conditions. Tripod or someway to steady the camera are really important when you are taking those low light still shots.

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I agree that the photos are fine for the camera's part, but some indirect lighting on the front of the objects would work wonders.

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