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thepar

Overclocking 920 Voltages

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I have been learning how to overclock the 920. I ran prime 95 on over night and am currently at 59 degrees at load temperatures at stock.

 

I currently have the the CPU voltage at 1.1 for 3.2 GHZ according to this guide:

My ram is at 1.5 volts. I was getting around 54 degrees at load temperatures with prime 95 which was less then stock. I though that was strange.....

 

http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/overclockin...-beginners.html

 

My only concern with overclocking is leaving all of the voltages on the AUTO setting. I am afraid the computer will give the uncore voltage too much voltage that would be unnecessary.

 

My other question is it looks like i have to use different ram timings and voltages at different speeds. Is this true?

 

Gigabyte also skipped over 1.65 and went from 1.64-1.66 for the ram. My ram is rated at 1.65 volts at 7-7-7-20 timings.

 

Any ideas?

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The voltage required to run a set speed depends solely on your chip. Each one is different. The same goes for your memory. The faster you go you have to either increase voltage (to a point) or relax the timings

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My Bm is the same. I just set to 1.64 and thats fine.

 

They say you can overvolt ram a little but this can reduce its life.

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What about the voltage to the ram? Will going 1.66 break the ram?

 

 

Nope! I have more than a few boards that do that!

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The voltage required to run a set speed depends solely on your chip. Each one is different. The same goes for your memory. The faster you go you have to either increase voltage (to a point) or relax the timings

 

Is there anyway to know how much voltage is too much before you actually try it? And what does "relax" the timings mean?

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Is there anyway to know how much voltage is too much before you actually try it? And what does "relax" the timings mean?

 

Ok little cpu voltage for you:

Voltage ? this depend of motherboard and cpu but <_<

 

Extreme voltage i920 around 4600mhz in short

time use ( not 100% load like prime blablabla, cpu will burn ! :P

Not over 1,53v with watercooling

Not over 1.51v With AIR

------------------

4300-4400mhz

For normal use with program, games, web blabla. no prime cpukillerprogram

1,40-1.45v same Air\WC

-----------------------

NO TURBO ENABLE !

cpu dont like 1.4-1-5v with economy 2500mhz .

always fullspeed mhz or it will crash

----------------------------------

If you want to burn your cpu to death with 100% 24h load-program for fun, go for just a little tiny more than standard volt

Edited by RobBan-Swe

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Is there anyway to know how much voltage is too much before you actually try it? And what does "relax" the timings mean?

 

 

To much is what kills the CPU or degrades it. It can be stock voltage or higher. I have yet to have a CPU die on me with higher than stock voltages but then again I am not pushing 1.5-2.0 volts through them either. Relaxing the timings mean to set them at a level that higher than they were specified to run at .

 

 

Example 8-8-8-24 are your memory subtimings and to relax them would be to increase the timings Ie 9-9-9-28

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To much is what kills the CPU or degrades it. It can be stock voltage or higher. I have yet to have a CPU die on me with higher than stock voltages but then again I am not pushing 1.5-2.0 volts through them either. Relaxing the timings mean to set them at a level that higher than they were specified to run at .

 

 

Example 8-8-8-24 are your memory subtimings and to relax them would be to increase the timings Ie 9-9-9-28

 

 

Thats the first time I have seen timings explained ccoke thanks loads!! ( at least where I could understand it ) lol

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