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Confused about memory


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Ok,

 

I have:

 

OCZ 6GB (3 x 2048mb) DDR3 1600 (PC12800 - OCZ3P1600LV6GK) RAM Module Kit (Triple Kit for i7)

 

with the following stats:

 

1600MHz DDR3

CL 7-7-7-24

(CAS-TRCD-TRP-TRAS)

6GB Triple Channel Optimized kits

Platinum Z3 XTC Heatspreader*

Lifetime Warranty

1.65 Volts

240 Pin DIMM

 

Now I know that the mempory speed is related to the FSBRAM

 

Currently the speed is around 1440

Volts are 1.66

 

CPU-Z lists the timmings as 10-9-9-22

 

What is more imortant - Timings or speed??

I take it that higher speed means higher timmings?

 

Any advice welcome...

 

Thanks.

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What is more imortant - Timings or speed??

 

The clock speed is more important than the timings performance wise. For example, a Corsair module at 2000MHz with 8-8-8-24 timings is faster than a module at 1866MHz with 7-8-7-20 timings. But a corsair module at 2000MHz with 7-8-7-20 timings is faster than the module with 8-8-8-24 timings.

 

I take it that higher speed means higher timmings?

 

Usually, the higher the clock speed, the higher the timings.

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You know what? Outside of benchmarks, neither clock speed, nor timings really matters. Just set your RAM to run at it's rated settings ;)

 

I take it that higher speed means higher timmings?

Yes, generally.

 

Memory needs X nanoseconds before it can move on to something else. Let's say... 10.

At 1000 MHz, a clock cycle = 1 ns

At 2000 MHz, a clock cycle = 0.5 ns

So the 1000 MHz will only need to wait for 10 clock cycles, while the 2 GHz waits for 20 cycles, but in reality they both waited just as long.

 

Of course there is more behind timings, but that's the rough reason why high clock = high timings

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Memory needs X nanoseconds before it can move on to something else. Let's say... 10.

At 1000 MHz, a clock cycle = 1 ns

At 2000 MHz, a clock cycle = 0.5 ns

So the 1000 MHz will only need to wait for 10 clock cycles, while the 2 GHz waits for 20 cycles, but in reality they both waited just as long.

 

Of course there is more behind timings, but that's the rough reason why high clock = high timings

Good explanation. :)

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