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Game Copy "Protection"


rivalary
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I'm a PC gamer. I buy 1-2 games a month and mostly enjoy them. I look up reviews before making my purchase as I cannot return the game if it plain stinks, and I usually enjoy the game.

 

I bought Fallout 3 a while back and now just decided to check it out. Well, apparently Securom doesn't like my Nero Burning ROM program, bundled with my LG optical drive. It basically says "uninstall it, or you cannot play." How about, no, I will not uninstall it. Oh yeah, and a big **** you to Sony to suggest that I do that or waste the $50 I paid for it.

 

More than once I've been stung by copy protection. My Neverwinter Nights game refused to acknowledge that the original disc was inserted in my optical drive. Turns out whatever copy protection they had used didn't like the brand I had chosen for my optical drive. XIII let me play, for a bit. As soon as I needed the second disc, the game wouldn't allow me to continue. After some research, again it was caused by the copy protection. Now, I didn't have to really solve the NWN problem as shortly after they released the game, they patched it to remove the copy protection that was plaguing many people. However, my XIII game had to be cracked to be used. I don't believe this should have been required to enjoy my non-returnable purchase. (Sorry that I broke the rules saying I used a crack, but hey, it was for a legit purpose)

 

Yeah, I didn't read the EULA - it's a bit moot to read as I've already cracked the case and the software is unreturnable, not to mention every EULA is a huge read. Even if I read it would I understand it? Should I bring it to a lawyer to translate? As a consumer, how can this possibly be expected of me?

So somewhere in this EULA is a section about copyright protection software, I'm sure. Something saying that I agree to have it installed, agree to it screwing with whatever it feels like and agreeing to having data collected and sent back for whatever they feel like doing with it. The alternative: to quit PC gaming.

I would seem we have no rights to control or secure our computers if we are gamers.

 

I suppose these copy protections don't effect our computers? I suppose they work as intended, not going deeper than required, not touching anything that would be questionable. Hmm, not if you read around. Here's what I stole from http://reclaimyourgame.com/index.php?optio...9&Itemid=96

 

* It is installed without conspicuous user notification or consent (usually only mentioned buried in the EULA, as a vague reference to

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From what I hear Fallout 3 is an awesome game, I say crack it.

 

Most copy protection software can technically be classified as malware or spyware because of the reasons you listed.

 

* It is installed without conspicuous user notification or consent (usually only mentioned buried in the EULA, as a vague reference to ‘copy protection software’)

* It hides itself from the user by means of hidden folders and files

* It installs registry keys with null values that cannot be removed by the user without resorting to third-party software

* It usurps control over the user’s computer and prevents certain other forms of software from running (such as Microsoft’s Process Explorer)

* It accesses the operating system’s kernel (also known as ring-0) and, if ever a security vulnerability is found and exploited by hackers, the user will be unable to recover control over the computer.

* It can be used to report information from the user’s computer to remote servers without the user’s knowledge or consent.

* It is not uninstalled when the user uninstalls the game

* Even if SecuROM is not present on a game when purchased, it can be surreptitiously added later if a user attempts to install a patch or Electronic Arts’ download manager software.

 

Spyware, is a type of malware that is installed on computers and that collects information about users without their knowledge. The presence of spyware is typically hidden from the user. Typically, spyware is secretly installed on the user's personal computer. Sometimes, however, spywares such as keyloggers are installed by the owner of a shared, corporate, or public computer on purpose in order to secretly monitor other users.

Malware, short for malicious software, is software designed to infiltrate or damage a computer system without the owner's informed consent. The expression is a general term used by computer professionals to mean a variety of forms of hostile, intrusive, or annoying software or program code.[1] The term "computer virus" is sometimes used as a catch-all phrase to include all types of malware, including true viruses.

 

Anyone else see any simalarities here?

Edited by slick2500

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Glad I purchased FO 3 on the Xbox 360. :P It can be a fun game... though you have to play a bad guy (IMO) to have the most fun. :) I'm not condoning any type of legal action, but I believe you have the right to play the software that you purchased.

 

 

* It installs registry keys with null values that cannot be removed by the user without resorting to third-party software
The MS registry has been an epic fail since day 1. However, registry keys CAN be removed without 3rd party software by simply using regedit. You just have to know what and where to look for the crap.

 

* It is installed without conspicuous user notification or consent (usually only mentioned buried in the EULA, as a vague reference to

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You should - it's worthy of GOTY 2008 for sure.

 

+1.

 

I buy my games from the Game shop at my Local Mall (or ebay), i even keep all my recipts incase some crazy butt SWAT team descides to raid my house :P i have very strong (but level headed) veiws on the matter of software piracy, if anyone wishes to enlighten their ignorance, here is an Excellent report on it that i suggest you read in full: http://www.tweakguides.com/Piracy_1.html This is why i am against piracy and i do my upmost best not to pirate, and i suggest you all do the same.

 

However i will not tolerate Copy 'protection' hindering my security, personal information or my computers performance under any circumstances. Therefore, i have come up with a simple guide which enable's me to play all the games i wish to buy, without spyware and without having to slide into the wrong side of the law. Its a fine line but if your honest with yourself and use your head you'll be okay.

 

Step 1 - Read reviews of the game in question, download and try out the demo if its available. This will help you make up your mind if you want the game in the first place.

 

Step 2: If you want the game BUY THE GAME! Piracy really is the reason why developers have started to cut us PC gamers out of the picture (or treat us as 2nd class) and focus more on consoles. If everyone does their part by avoiding piracy and buying the game it will help bring the devs back to making great PC games for us all.

 

This next step may cause controvacy among some of you but consider this: Once you have purchased the game, you own the rights to playing it and to modifying it or whattever else. Its your decision to do with it what you will, you may NOT however replicate and distribute it for any reason. Making a copy of it for backup purposes is just fine, i always burn a backup copy of each of my games just in case.

 

Okay Step 3: use the power of the internet to search for a way to install your (LEGIT!) game without copy 'protection'. The cleanest way i believe is just to use a simple NO CD. (Yes its legal, read step 4) If that fails look arround, unfortunatly shady places can also be remarkably proficient at indirectly providing support for us legit buyers.

 

Step 4: Install your legit game, with the internet turned off, this prevents securerom or whattever connecting to the internet and installing spyware, which it has covered up with a false label of 'protection'. After your (LEGIT!) game has been installed, use the no cd - yes its perfectly legal to use a no cd, for the purpose of not having to keep your cd in its drive and to prevent it from being scratched up. (again, its only legal if you BUY THE GAME!)

i WON'T go into any details, as im assuming you are all savvy enough users here and i Really dont want to get banned, as i Love the OCC!

 

Step 5: play your game with a clear concience, because you bought it, and earned the right to play it the way you want! if this is illegal then i dont see why people are even allowed to create Modded content for their games. Alas, my method will only be effective if you are Honest with yourself and i cannot help you there. I hope i have not said anything to jepordize my membership here but i felt i must voice my opinion, good luck with your game OP.

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I agree, if you own the product you can crack it all you want.

 

A far as I'm concerned anything that enhances your gameplay (or even initiates it :P) is acceptable as long as it is not infringing on someone elses gameplay (as in you having an advantage over someone in multiplayer).

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found this on a readme about securom in my comp

 

readme.txt

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PLEASE DO NOT DELETE THE FILES IN THIS FOLDER BECAUSE YOU MIGHT LOOSE ESSENTIAL DIGITAL RIGHTS.

READ BELOW

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Technical Information for the PC Administrator:

 

The files securom_v7_01.dat and securom_v7_01.bak have been created during the installation of a SecuROM protected application.

It guarantees more user convenience because the original disc does not have to be in the local drive at all times anymore.

It is necessary for copy protected CDs, demo versions and protected software downloaded from the Internet.

The file contains your licences for all products which are SecuROM protected, therefore it will not be deleted automatically.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PLEASE DO NOT DELETE THE FILE BECAUSE YOU MIGHT LOOSE ESSENTIAL DIGITAL RIGHTS.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

The information contained in securom_v7_01.dat will not be transferred to any other computer without your permission.

 

This security system is connected with a MS Windows Service called "SecuROM User Access Service".

This module is started automatically when launching a protected application if the user is logged in with Windows administrator rights.

In case users do not have administrator rights we recommend to keep it running.

 

See www.securom.com for further information

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

The following text is reproduced here to comply with OpenSSL license terms:

 

====================================================================

Copyright © 1998-2005 The OpenSSL Project. All rights reserved.

 

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without

modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions

are met:

 

1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

 

2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright

notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in

the documentation and/or other materials provided with the

distribution.

 

3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this

software must display the following acknowledgment:

"This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project

for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/)"

 

4. The names "OpenSSL Toolkit" and "OpenSSL Project" must not be used to

endorse or promote products derived from this software without

prior written permission. For written permission, please contact

[email protected]

 

5. Products derived from this software may not be called "OpenSSL"

nor may "OpenSSL" appear in their names without prior written

permission of the OpenSSL Project.

 

6. Redistributions of any form whatsoever must retain the following

acknowledgment:

"This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project

for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit (http://www.openssl.org/)"

 

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE OpenSSL PROJECT ``AS IS'' AND ANY

EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE

IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR

PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE OpenSSL PROJECT OR

ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,

SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT

NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES;

LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)

HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT,

STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE)

ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED

OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

====================================================================

 

This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young

([email protected]). This product includes software written by Tim

Hudson ([email protected]).

====================================================================

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Does anyone else here believe Anti-piracy promotes piracy?

 

The more they try to lock things down the more the hacks will crack it.

Yes since most pirated material is free of the hassles of the DRM they put in. I honstly feel that some consumers feel to burned by the strict EULAs and the strict DRM that they sometimes either,

1. Don't consider purchasing the game,

2. Same as one but they pirate it, or

3. Buy it but install a pirated copy and use their legit key to elimate the DRM from the install.

Edited by Compxpert

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I have Fallout 3 on steam. No problems (except for the game not properly loading in vista x64 - I just run it in XP).

 

Very good game...worth the money :)

 

PS. I bought the steam version so I wouldn't have to worry about craptastic securom (I don't think I'll buy a game that has it...)

Edited by Crazy_Nate

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