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panjang110

undervolting cpu

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It's reading incorrectly then. .675 volts isn't enough to turn on any normal transistor (let alone a CPU)...

 

I could believe .8 volts but the closer you get to .7 the more skeptical I will be.

Though I still haven't gone outside the limits you described, I've proven a chip can operate sub 1.0v :D

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I wouldn't call the transistors in a CPU "Normal" (although I couldn't actually tell you what they are). Put it this way, we're not talking about your standard BC546 ;)

You'd be absolutely correct in believing they aren't "normal." Transistors in CPUs are leaky and have a much higher threshold than an ideal transistor.

 

Waco is thick headed...

 

I'll investigate further and come back to you :)

Waco has taken classes on transistors and refuses to believe you got any transistor (let alone full CPU) to run under .7 volts. .7 volts isn't a rule of thumb threshold voltage for no reason.

Edited by Waco

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When I was a lad, back in the days of the bipolar transistor 0.6V was the magic number. Whether NPN (eg. BC547) or PNP (eg. 2N3702) the bipolar transistor required 0.6V difference between the base and emitter to switch on/off.

 

Todays modern cpu's are made from mosfets of one type or another, it's hard to keep track, and their operating voltage, when used in a cpu, is very frequency dependent. (Something like 0.925V for 2.66GHz and 1.300V for 4GHz+, but don't quote me on this! :lol: ).

 

Cheers

 

Paul

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When I was a lad, back in the days of the bipolar transistor 0.6V was the magic number. Whether NPN (eg. BC547) or PNP (eg. 2N3702) the bipolar transistor required 0.6V difference between the base and emitter to switch on/off.

I'm pretty sure it's just over .7 volts for both the transistors you listed (at least, that's what the datasheet say). They won't be fully into saturation at .6 volts.

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