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New System Build - Worked for a few days then stopped

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AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+ Windsor

ASUS M3A32 MVP Deluxe

Corsair 520HX ([email protected],[email protected],[email protected],[email protected],[email protected],- [email protected],[email protected])

Corsair 4x 1GB

MSI NX8600GTS TD256E OC

 

Hi All,

It's been a while since I built a new rig. My old system is a AMD 1700+ and it's slow!

 

I built a new one and it ran fine for a few days with no problem. Installed a few games when when i tried to play it would freeze, black out then reboot. I tried trouble shooting by only using 1 mem stick. Also, moved the card into different slots. Same problem occurs, game would start... Black Out then Reboot.

 

I tried it Mem stick. Then the next reboot it just stopped working all together. I would power on the system. LCD light would turn green then turn orange. I RMA'd the Vid card and i'm getting the same problem. I tested with a lower end card PNY FX 1700 and it booted up fine.

 

 

Called Asus and they said that the output of the vid card might be lower than what's needed. I don't have the numbers, i'll post them when i get home.

 

Thanks for any input

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Is this a new or your old MOBO?

 

Did you overclock it at all?

 

What temperatures was the card hitting?

 

I'd do whatever ASUS told you and find out the numbers when you get home.

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Is this a new or your old MOBO?

 

Did you overclock it at all?

 

What temperatures was the card hitting?

 

I'd do whatever ASUS told you and find out the numbers when you get home.

 

 

All hardware parts are new. Not overclocked, but the video card is OC'd from factory.

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Have you run any stability tests (memtest86+, then Prime95)? Did you do the necessary modifications / checks within BIOS (memory voltages). Check your timings, too.

 

If you've received errors from memtest86+, there is no guarantee that your OS install went properly. I test the bejesus out of everything before I install too much stuff...it's much easier to catch things then.

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Have you run any stability tests (memtest86+, then Prime95)? Did you do the necessary modifications / checks within BIOS (memory voltages). Check your timings, too.

 

If you've received errors from memtest86+, there is no guarantee that your OS install went properly. I test the bejesus out of everything before I install too much stuff...it's much easier to catch things then.

 

I didn't run any stability tests.

 

I was suspecting the CPU... but shouldn't a 520w be sufficient?

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I tried it Mem stick. Then the next reboot it just stopped working all together. I would power on the system. LCD light would turn green then turn orange. I RMA'd the Vid card and i'm getting the same problem. I tested with a lower end card PNY FX 1700 and it booted up fine.

Wait, maybe I am misreading but you tried 1 memory stick and it stopped working altogether so RMA'd the video card??

 

Assuming you had the memory stick in the right slot it should have worked with just 1. If it didn't than your problem might be your memory.

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Those corsairs are very well regarded. I'd start testing if I were you (I have a section in my build guide about what tests I run).

 

I treat all my hardware like I don't know the condition of it when I get it. Memtest will usually tell you if your memory is faulty, or if you're running incorrect memory timings / voltage settings. Prime95 and OCCT will test the CPU and memory, I'd run a "blend" test for at least 8 hours. Watch your temperatures with Coretemp or Realtemp. Graphics cards can be tested with a variety of programs. I usually run several of the recent 3dmark programs, and furmark, again watching temperatures (GPUz has a tab that will show temperatures). There are fitness tools for harddrives based on the manufacturer. PSU's are hard to test by the general user (without an oscilloscope), but the symptoms can be more obvious, not starting properly, cutting out under load.

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Wait, maybe I am misreading but you tried 1 memory stick and it stopped working altogether so RMA'd the video card??

 

Assuming you had the memory stick in the right slot it should have worked with just 1. If it didn't than your problem might be your memory.

 

I tested 1 stick at a time. It booted fine... then when I installed all 4 again. But after iinstalling the 4, that's when the monitor turned green for 3 secs or so then orange.

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Eww, follow CrazyNate's suggestion and run those tests. At the VERY LEAST the memtest one, but seriously consider the rest ...especially consider Prime 95 and OCCT.

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Please run through the troubleshooting steps below. If they do not correct the issue there is a good chance of a hardware failure on the motherboard itself. You may want to contact our RMA Department at 510-739-3777 opt #2 for warranty service.

 

The stability problems you are seeing can usually be narrowed down to 1 of 4 things please follow the steps below to see if they will help resolve the problem you are having.First make sure that your cpu is not overheating,you can verify this by either checking the hardware monitor in your bios or by installing the ASUS probe program so that you can monitor your temperatures, voltages and fan speeds from inside your Windows operating system.Also the probe utility comes with the option to record one of these 3 things at a time.Go into the history tab of your probe utility and set it to record and using the drop down box choose which function you will be recording on,first I would set it to record temps. until the instability occurs, if you do not see any change in temp. when the instability occurs then next set the probe to record temps. and finally fan speeds.

 

If you do not see any drastic changes in any of these three the the next step would be to verify the memory you have as compatable with the motherboard you have.

As we do not validate memory ourselves you will need to contact the memory manufacturer and verify that the memory you have of theirs is a tested and approved model # and that the cas latency timings being read in the bios are correct.If the settings in the bios are not the correct timings ask them for the timings needed to run your memory on this motherboard, once you have these timings either the memory manufacturer or one of our technicians can help you hard code these timings into your system.You may also want to ask the manufacturer if there are any memory diagnostic tests that they can recommend that would also help in determining if the memory is causing the problems you are having, there are programs out there that will help in diagnosing problems with memory such as the ones found at www.memtest86.com or the microsoft memtest diagnostic tool, although we do not officially support these tests your manufacturer may suggest one of these I have listed or another that they themselves use.

 

Power is another issue that can cause instability to occur, as there are numerous power supply manufacturers on the market it is not viable anymore to just go by what the manufacturer claims the wattage to be as 400 watts to 1 company may be considered to be actually only 300 watts to another.With this being the case it is more feasable to recommend that you check the amperage for each of the voltage rails of the power supply you are purchasing by looking at the sticker on the side of the power supply.On the side of your power supply there will be a sticker that has the dc outputs for each of the 3 voltage rails supplying power to your motherboard, we recommend at least 28 amps on the +3.3 voltage rail which supplies power to your CPU and AGP/PCIe slot, at least 35 amps on the +5 voltage rail which supplies power to all of the IC chips on your motherboard and a minimum of at least 18-20 amps on the +12 voltage rail which provides power to your drives and fans. these are just recomendations and may need to be adjusted depending on your set-up and the type of hardware you are using as certain newer cards ie: sound and video cards are needing more power than some of their older counterparts.

 

The last thing to be considered that can cause stability problems is grounding/emi interference, take your motherboard out of the case you have it in and set it up on top of the cardboard box that it came in straight to the cardboard or some other non-conductive material such as a phonebook or some newspaper, do not use an anti-static mat, foam or plastic as these have been known to keep a board from posting. Once you have the board set up outside the case connect up to it just the needed bare minimums to test for resolution to your stability issues these include power supply, video card (connected to the monitor), CPU (w/heatsink and fan), memory and the harddrive with the OS on it. Run the system out of the case and see if the stability problems you are having have been resolved, if after testing it out of the case it has become stable then before you mount it back into the case take some standard black electrical tape and make a cross over each of the metal stand-offs you are screwing the board down into mount the board and screw down thru the tape.This will do 2 things first it will insure your board against any metal to metal grounds and will also lift the board up away from the case slightly preventing any EMI interferance from say a solder point that was sitting to close to the case.

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