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Hey everybody, my q is as follows my linksys wrt54gx4 seems to be not working correctly, I had the ckt brker go out 2 days last week and now I get no internet connection unless I hook up directly to the pc and bypass the router, so is it possible that it is fried or something.

 

Thanks

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It's certainly possible. When your PC is wired to your router are you able to ping it or access the setup page?

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Routers, at least the ones I've encountered, have a nasty habit of dieing for no apparent reason.... Way too much... The wrt54g I have now randomly drops connections and wanders back on after 2-3 min.

 

The first thing I'd try is resetting the thing though.

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It's certainly possible. When your PC is wired to your router are you able to ping it or access the setup page?

yep i can access the setup page, I've tried everything from soft to hard resets, but other then that i get nothing.

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I've had a number of issues with Linksys routers over the last couple of years; two routers, including a WRT54GS, have just died in the last 6 months.

 

My issue was basically the routers just up and decided one day not to pull an IP address from Comcast DHCP. Now matter how much I tried to force the connection... I could still access everything on the network, just not internet. Connect directly to the modem, and it worked fine.

 

1. Check cables.

2. Restart the router

3. Update the firmware

4. Reset the router

5. Buy a new router

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Most of the consumer routers are disposable objects. Work for two or three years, then they just die. Most of it is down to cheap components they use. Just buy a new one and don't worry about it too much.

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My Linksys WRT54G is dying too...

 

And their Live Chat support blows. I'm not buying Linksys again ;)

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This may sound funny, but overheating is sometimes an issue with routers. I have seen many cases were a drop connection is caused by overheating. I have had a WRT54G that has served me well that have had occasional hick-ups. Ocne I installed DD-WRT, it seems to work even better. Even though the thing is awesome. I recently replaced it with a Sonicwall TZ.....no turning back now.

 

Id recommend you hook up your computer directly to the modem and go to linksys and download the firware for the router......install it and see how it goes.

Edited by uneedav8

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This may sound funny, but overheating is sometimes an issue with routers. I have seen many cases were a drop connection is caused by overheating. I have had a WRT54G that has served me well that have had occasional hick-ups. Ocne I installed DD-WRT, it seems to work even better. Even though the thing is awesome. I recently replaced it with a Sonicwall TZ.....no turning back now.

 

Id recommend you hook up your computer directly to the modem and go to linksys and download the firware for the router......install it and see how it goes.

Just tried it and here's a twist, i get no internet connection from the modem to my main pc, so i am not so happy right now

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Like HT said, consumer/home routers are disposable. Since my first Linksys Broadband Router in about 2000, or 1999, I've gone through maybe half a dozen. Yeah, it sucks to have the router crap out and it really sucks to have my home network lose internet connection, but $50 every two or three years is worth it to me. If you don't like that, spend over a grand on a corporate router that will outlast your grandchildren.

 

Heating and cooling is an issue with all electronic devices (as the members of this forum very well know), and I notice most router implementations are in the hottest, dirtiest corner of any given office or home. Making sure your router has access to cool air, or at the very least open airflow, will vastly improve the lifetime of the device.

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You could:

plug your modem into a "normal" port in your router (not the WAN port, but a computer/client port) then deactivate the DHCP function in the router (and modem if existing), then manually forward your computer with an ip to your modem.

 

for example; i got a really crappy router that shuts down now and then, and a modem with the IP of 192.168.0.254, so i give my computers in the network addresses that look like: 192.168.0.X (where X = 1-253), and i put the gateway and DNS too 192.168.0.254 (my modems IP)

 

Works like a charm, static networks FTW!

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