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B.C. Xtreme

Serious computer problem after an overclock went wrong

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Hey,

 

I think I might have accidentally tried to fry a computer component while trying to overclock; I'm hoping maybe someone here could reassure me and tell me how to fix whatever's wrong now with my system.

 

As I said in my computer specs, I have an Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 processor running at 2.20 GHz. Well, I'd heard that the E4500 can be overclocked to as much as 3.0 GHz if cooled properly, so like an idiot I decided to try it. I went into my Phoenix BIOS and upped the clock speed to 2.3 GHz. I booted back into Vista and checked around, everything was stable and temp was cool. So I went back into the BIOS, upped it to 2.4 GHz. Back in Vista, everything still stable and cool. I repeated this process, jumping to 2.6 GHz, and then to 2.8 GHz. Finally, I made the 3.0 GHz jump.

 

Now here's where something must have gone wrong. Vista booted up, but only one of my two monitors received a video signal. Unfortunately, this was the secondary monitor, so it was blank on the login screen. I knew it was on because I could move my cursor over there and see it. Thinking Vista must have booted incorrectly, I turned the computer off and rebooted again. This time (and every time I've tried it since) neither screen powered on at all. Not even to show the BIOS loading. As far as I can tell by the lights on my peripherals, Vista isn't loading at all.

 

So I consulted some documentation, and saw that resetting the CMOS on my motherboard should fix the problem by putting the clock speeds back to default. I completed the proper reset procedure on my EVGA nForce 680i SLI motherboard, and turned on my computer with high hopes. A noticeable difference in fan noise, caused by higher fan speeds, told me that the BIOS settings were indeed back to default. However, my screens still aren't getting a video signal, and I still have no reason to believe that Vista is even starting up.

 

I should mention that at no time during the overclocking process, even after the 2.8 GHz jump (the last one that worked), did my CPU temperature go above 45 C. I'm starting to panic now, wondering if somehow something got damaged despite this.

 

I really need this computer to be functional. Does anyone have ANYTHING that I might be able to do to get this computer running again?

 

ANY help you can offer would be greatly appreciated!

- Phil

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Hey,

 

I think I might have accidentally tried to fry a computer component while trying to overclock; I'm hoping maybe someone here could reassure me and tell me how to fix whatever's wrong now with my system.

 

As I said in my computer specs, I have an Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 processor running at 2.20 GHz. Well, I'd heard that the E4500 can be overclocked to as much as 3.0 GHz if cooled properly, so like an idiot I decided to try it. I went into my Phoenix BIOS and upped the clock speed to 2.3 GHz. I booted back into Vista and checked around, everything was stable and temp was cool. So I went back into the BIOS, upped it to 2.4 GHz. Back in Vista, everything still stable and cool. I repeated this process, jumping to 2.6 GHz, and then to 2.8 GHz. Finally, I made the 3.0 GHz jump.

 

Now here's where something must have gone wrong. Vista booted up, but only one of my two monitors received a video signal. Unfortunately, this was the secondary monitor, so it was blank on the login screen. I knew it was on because I could move my cursor over there and see it. Thinking Vista must have booted incorrectly, I turned the computer off and rebooted again. This time (and every time I've tried it since) neither screen powered on at all. Not even to show the BIOS loading. As far as I can tell by the lights on my peripherals, Vista isn't loading at all.

 

So I consulted some documentation, and saw that resetting the CMOS on my motherboard should fix the problem by putting the clock speeds back to default. I completed the proper reset procedure on my EVGA nForce 680i SLI motherboard, and turned on my computer with high hopes. A noticeable difference in fan noise, caused by higher fan speeds, told me that the BIOS settings were indeed back to default. However, my screens still aren't getting a video signal, and I still have no reason to believe that Vista is even starting up.

 

I should mention that at no time during the overclocking process, even after the 2.8 GHz jump (the last one that worked), did my CPU temperature go above 45 C. I'm starting to panic now, wondering if somehow something got damaged despite this.

 

I really need this computer to be functional. Does anyone have ANYTHING that I might be able to do to get this computer running again?

 

ANY help you can offer would be greatly appreciated!

- Phil

 

If you didn't increase voltages I doubt anything is dead.

 

Try clearing your CMOS by removing the battery for 10 seconds.

 

If that doesn't work try booting with only one stick of RAM.

 

If that doesn't work try reseating everything.

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If you didn't increase voltages I doubt anything is dead.

 

Try clearing your CMOS by removing the battery for 10 seconds.

 

If that doesn't work try booting with only one stick of RAM.

 

If that doesn't work try reseating everything.

 

Now when you say "reseating everything," what exactly is "everything?" My motherboard has a lot of stuff on it...

 

Perhaps not enough voltages?> but then it wouldn't boot at all..

 

Yeah, that's possible, but resetting the CMOS should have undone the overclock, so there should be no need for extra voltage, right?

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Obvious suggestions have been said, including the reseat of the parts that Krow suggested.

 

For the CMOS reset, make sure you leave the battery out for a good ten or fifteen minutes like tacohunter52 said and unplug the power supply.It might even be a good idea to hit the power button a few times while it's all unplugged to attempt to drain the juice out of the remaining parts.

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OK, I'll definitely go through all of these steps in the morning! I do have a few more questions though:

 

1. If booting with only one RAM chip does the trick, what will I have to do to get the other chips working again?

 

2. Does anyone know what about my overclocking might have caused this in the first place, so I know for next time?

 

3. Will clearing the CMOS by removing the battery cause any damage to my hard drives?

Edited by B.C. Xtreme

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Hey,

 

Well my system is up and running! I've got a stable overclock at 2.4 GHz, and I unfortunately have absolutely no idea what actually fixed the problem. Sometime during the process I think my monitor got turned off, and I didn't realize that till I was done. Any of the steps I took might have worked, and I wouldn't have been able to tell. So, thanks to all who helped!

 

- Phil

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Hey,

 

Well my system is up and running! I've got a stable overclock at 2.4 GHz, and I unfortunately have absolutely no idea what actually fixed the problem. Sometime during the process I think my monitor got turned off, and I didn't realize that till I was done. Any of the steps I took might have worked, and I wouldn't have been able to tell. So, thanks to all who helped!

 

- Phil

 

That's funny, always start with the simplest things first when troubleshooting ;)

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That's funny, always start with the simplest things first when troubleshooting ;)

 

I do! In fact, I did this time! Once you reach a certain point though ... I mean CMOS reset, reseating components, and etc are all equally advanced, for the most part.

 

While I'm here, how much of a speed difference should I see when overclocking a processor from 2.2 to 2.4 GHz?

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don't stop @2.4, go directly to 2.8, the last setting you got to work properly....then start some stress testing to check stability....you may have to add small smidgen of juice to the CPU or the ramski to get it all 'happy' again....once you get infected it is hard to stop, LOL...and you will enjoy the little 'extra boost' from the clockage....

 

good luck...

 

laterzzzz.................

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I did not do any long-term temperature/stability readings above 2.4 GHz, so I can't be sure that the higher speeds will work. My current plan is to up the speed by 0.1GHz when I restart my computer every few days. That way I can do long-term analyses.

 

What speed does a Core 2 Duo have to run at in order to outperform a Core 2 Quad @2.33GHz?

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