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troy5061

Q6600 + Evga 750i Ftw

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Im going to be helping a friend OC his setup he just got in and I might need some help. Hes aiming at 3.2-3.6ghz. Does this board usually require a bump in NB voltage.

 

So far I have gathered for 3.6 it will need:

 

CPU Vcore 1.42v

CPU FSB 1.4v

Ram 2.1-2.2v

SPP 1.5v

 

I havent seen anywhere that people are upping the NB voltage, anyone here have any experience with these?

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So far I have gathered for 3.6 it will need:

 

CPU Vcore 1.42v

CPU FSB 1.4v

Ram 2.1-2.2v

SPP 1.5v

 

How did you "gather" that? Vcore: Every chip is different. Unless you've already gotten it stable at 3.6, then you don't know how many volts it will require. FSB: Maybe, but really the same as I said about the CPU. Until you get where you are going, you won't really know if you need that much or not. RAM: Don't make that assumption about your memory. Look at the spec your memory is supposed to run at. It might be 1.8v... it might be 2.3... [...]. If you keep your memory strapped to whatever its stock speed is, you might not need any increase in voltage.

 

Anyway, start slow and make small increases. When you experience instability, add voltage. Don't just guess at values or assume that because someone else is using those values that you should.

 

See this http://forums.overclockersclub.com/index.php?showtopic=71656

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How did you "gather" that? Vcore: Every chip is different.

:withstupid:

So True. Unless you have recorded these settings from personal testing with the specific components, I would just go about overclocking like any other computer, in small increments and through trial and error.

Just start off with the basics: the FSB, and the multiplier. Once you reach the barrier tinker with the Vcore. Once you hit another barrier that's when you should start getting into changing chipset voltages, and changing settings with your ram.

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How did you "gather" that? Vcore: Every chip is different. Unless you've already gotten it stable at 3.6, then you don't know how many volts it will require. FSB: Maybe, but really the same as I said about the CPU. Until you get where you are going, you won't really know if you need that much or not. RAM: Don't make that assumption about your memory. Look at the spec your memory is supposed to run at. It might be 1.8v... it might be 2.3... [...]. If you keep your memory strapped to whatever its stock speed is, you might not need any increase in voltage.

 

Anyway, start slow and make small increases. When you experience instability, add voltage. Don't just guess at values or assume that because someone else is using those values that you should.

 

See this http://forums.overclockersclub.com/index.php?showtopic=71656

 

I was just looking for a starting point, no need for the attitude.

 

My ram says 2.2v but I never run it at that, 2.1v is fine for 950mhz which is 150mhz overclock, so no I dont always go by what the package says.

Edited by troy5061

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I was just looking for a starting point, no need for the attitude.

 

Apparently, what one of my Lit professors always said is true: Written word is *always* subject to interpretation.

 

I gave you a starting point. Read the sticky I linked to and you're golden. Make small increases and write down every single setting you change and the results of those changes. Overclocking is (for lack of better words) a scientific process and you should treat it as such. If you get in some sort of hurry and start out too high... and then throw voltage at a problem that might not even exist, you're not going to have very much fun and your parts (your buddies parts) might not survive.

Edited by KrankyOldLady
spanish is not the language for this forum

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