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so im currently building my computer, im just waiting to get a hard drive now but everything elce is done and ive booted it up a couple times. ive got an ASRock alive-nf5-ESATA2. while im waiting for my hard drive, i was wondering if you guys could tell me if there is anything to set or do in my bios. i dont really know much about bios stuff and so far all ive managed to do is set the recommended ram mhz. could anyone teach me the way of the bios or just post a help topic.

 

THANKS :thumbs-up:

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If you are not OC'ing most of the default settings should be fine, the first thing I would do is set your boot order. By default a lot of bios will be set as the hard drive first. You will want cd-rom first, then hard drive, so that you can boot from CD to load your OS.

 

If you have no floppy drive, on the first page of your bios you will want to set it as none. So you don't get an error because it's looking for the floppy drive each time it boots up. Won't cause any issues other than you having to hit a key every time you turn on the computer.

 

Other than that, as I said, you shouldn't have to change to much. I don't know that bios or what it has for options, but most of the stuff is pretty straight forward and there should be explanations of what things are in the bios though they are not very descriptive.

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thanks, il do the boot order sonn then, i do plan to o.c despite never doing it before. i have an idea about it but its still a bit blurred in my mind. could you tell me how i should go about it in the bios. thanks

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I personally don't know that bios so I can't tell you exactly what you need to do.

 

As others have said before me OC'ing kind of an art form, and it takes a good amount of time and patience incrementally raising fsb frequencies, testing for stability, raising voltage, testing for stability, rinse repeat.

 

The first things I do is test the machine for stability at stock speeds, then I go and start raising the memory frequencies and voltages testing with memtest86+ w/a goal of 10 passes of test #5. If you pass that with know errors your memory should be stable at that frequency and voltage.

 

Once I know that my memory will be stable at the higher speeds and at what voltage I move on to the cpu. Incrementally raising fsb or qdr depending on your motherboard, and raising voltage when I get to a point that I cannot boot into windows. You want to do this all in small steps so you don't brick your mobo or burn out your cpu.

 

I also do stability tests at different settings with prime95. For 45nm cpu's I use real temp to monitor temperatures (coretemp for other cpu's), cpu-z to see the voltage tat's getting to the cpu after vdroop, and for stability testing the cpu I do a custom test of 8k-8k FFT's w/a goal of passing an eight hour test. I then do another custom test of 2064 -4096k FFT's and uncheck the checkbox under where you change the FFT size. Which should run the test on as much memory as the program can access IIRC.

 

Anyway there is a lot to it, and how you approach it can vary from bios to bios and is different depending on your cpu and memory as well. You can also raise and lower multipliers in concert with fsb or without touching the fsb. Because "multiplier x FSB = cpu frequency in mhz".

 

Look around the forums here for guides, there is a great guide by Crazy_Nate on building a new computer. As well as some guides on OC'ing with Intel, Intel 45nm cpu's, 680i and 780i chipsets, Amd64 cpu's et cetera. Just read as much as you can and look at your bios to see what options you have compared to how the guides tell you to do things. Also check manufacturers part specifications so you know voltage ratings for your hardware. Your usually safe to go a bit above that, but to much voltage can cause instability just as not enough voltage can and also contribute to over heating.

 

Hope that helps some, others may know that board a bit better and can give you a better explanation than I can. And there are people here on the forums that know much more about this type of thing than I do. So don't take just my word for it ;)

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FSB I go a bit higher than that, like 25 or 50mhz in my experience is ok. Just keep raising and booting into windows, once it won't boot go ahead and jump your vcore for your cpu a bit. When raising voltage I personally go with the smallest increment it will let me use. So I know i'm not over volting any more than I have to. As I said though, just cause it boots into windows doesn't mean that it is stable. You'll want to test for stability, and if it fails probably slightly up the voltage again and rerun the test for stability.

 

Sometimes you'll have to raise voltage on memory also. All depends on if you have memory linked and using a 1:1 fsb:dram ratio which means the memory runs at the same fsb as the cpu.

 

I really do suggest reading the guides here on the OCC forums, there are some more in depth explanations to things that I just don't have time to give ya right now where in i'm @ work.... as always ;)

Edited by s0rd3z

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ok, thanks for advice. ive juist stumbled on something im not sure of. i set my prmary vidocard adapter to PCIe as i put on 8400GS in a 16x pcie slot. and so i assume this is what im supposed to do to make sure its my graphics card doing the graphical processing. however i looked on my slimeline s3240 bios and it had the same thing as my other bios having the primary as pci when there is a HD radeon 2400 in there. am i supposed to set it to pcie as primary to get the best performance?

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You can, though I don't know if it makes any difference in performance per say. I think by setting that it sets it to use only that type of GPU, so others won't get used even if there is one in say an AGP or PCI slot.

 

By leaving that on auto it should basicaly detect what is the primary device, discrete just about always takes precedence over IGP's without you having to do anything, and use that.

 

Not a setting I normally worry about when I build computers for myself or for customers. Though most of the boards I end up buying for myself do not have IGP's on them cause they are made for enthusiast or gaming and only have connections for discrete GPU's. And a lot of my cutomers are just the avg. type that are fine with an IGP because they don't really game and only surf and do email.

Edited by s0rd3z

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