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Passive Subwoofer Needs A New Low Pass Filter


Compxpert
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Got a used woofer for my 5.1 system in my room and it does need a new low pass filter. Had been dropped at one point causing the coil to come off the crossover and actually physically snap off. Wire broke right at the coil its self and I soldered it back together as best I could but being the audiophile I am I can still hear that it is not 100%. I was wondering if you guys might know where I could find another one exactly like it and how I can test to find out what kind I need. (resistance and Hz level)

Edited by Compxpert

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does it look like this? http://www.auto-connect.co.uk/Subwoofer-fi...-600W_4706.html

 

most passive filters are quite simple, usually a capacitor, an inductor/resistor... if the circuit is really simple it would be pretty easy for someone to tell you the value of the faulty component...

 

it might be easier to just buy one from Crutchfield or maybe Radio Shack has them (I don't know what they have in-store since I'm in the UK)... or make a new one... most of them are just first-order RC low pass with a crossover point set somewhere between 100 and 150 Hz

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if the inductor doesn't have any writing on it indicating it's value, it pretty hard to measure it without an LCR meter... it's possible with a function generator and a simple circuit...

 

if Radio Shack sells LCR meters, and they have a components desk, go up with the inductor and ask to borrow an LCR meter to find out the inductance, and then see if they have one at the same value

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Are you absolutely sure there's something wrong with it after fixing it? If it's just the inductor 'flying lead' part that broke, and you managed to fix that, it's not gonna make an awful lot of difference to the inductance as far as I am aware.... The inductance happens largely in the turns, so as long as they are intact you should be OK.

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enamel coated wire can be a pure pain to solder, especially if it's thin, you need to scrape off the enamel before soldering, this is extremely important and if you soldered without scraping, its probably a very bad joint

 

a really sharp blade swept lengthways works quite well without actually cutting

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Dang if only I had some flux lying around. Any good substitutes. Also i've been working at it was sandpaper which is starting to work as my multimeter is telling me it conducts electricity. More or less I can solder it with the enamel on but it will not or poorly conducts electricity.

Edited by Compxpert

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