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jelly

When do you overclock?

  

59 members have voted

  1. 1.

    • Right off the bat
      29
    • Find stock stable then start overclocking
      21
    • Give it a few months
      4
    • When I need the power
      4
    • Overclocking just dont do it for me
      1


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So I got my new computer running and stable "prime95 for 24h 56m" and im get an itch to start overclocking. And that got me to thinking when do you guy start to overclock your computer if you overclock. So please vote and give a reason to your impules to overclock, or not to. :)

 

p.s. I think im going to start real soon.

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I selected 'right off the bat' but that's assuming I purchased the computer with the intent of overclocking it in the first place.

 

 

If it's a computer that I know won't be used for much besides internet browsing I probably wouldn't touch it. But then it probably wouldn't be made of the best overclocking gear in the world anyways.

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I set my hardware at default, run it through the gamut of stabilty testing programs i.e. Memtest (always first) Orthos, Prime and OCCT, 3D Mark (all of them), frag a little with my favorite FPS.

 

If all of that comes back clear then it's time to start OC until I find the breaking point, then I back it down some.

 

Redo all of the benchmark and stability tests, if they pass, I lock it down.

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I normally just do a small increase on the fsb right off the bat, and if that does not pass stress test for at least an hour, I back track and test the ram. If it does pass the first OC then I increase it a bit more. With the NF4's I followed the guide and test the cpu and ram seperately and put them together after getting max out of both, most of the time I get a lower result on the ram when the cpu is involved. Now with my two Intel chips, I just browse the OCDB and find a system similar to my hardware and go from there at a reduced speed.

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Right off the bat baby. Computer hardware is reliable enough to juice it, especially if you're just running on air. Plus I upgrade within a two year time period, so I end up selling most my stuff anyways.

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I selected 'right off the bat' but that's assuming I purchased the computer with the intent of overclocking it in the first place.

 

 

If it's a computer that I know won't be used for much besides internet browsing I probably wouldn't touch it. But then it probably wouldn't be made of the best overclocking gear in the world anyways.

 

How did you manage to say what I was thinking? :confused:

 

When do you overclock?

- When I specifically purchase the parts with the intention to OC.

 

- When I have had the parts for a while and want to give it a performance boost.

 

- When I want a fast pc but don't want to spend a lot of money.

 

- When I know that the product will OC and achieve the same performance as the higher end version.

 

- Hello my name is (insert name here) and I'm an addict.

 

:)

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I "Find stock stable then start overclocking". Which most of my rigs are in the SSDB. So I use the SSDB as my guide to start.

 

I only build computer for myself so I want the most out of them. I overclock to the standards of the OCDB then adjust to [email protected] 24/7 stable.

 

I want the screaming [email protected] machines. :sweat:

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I get it stable and then I start to push it and if it breaks I can send it back, unless it was over volted they will never know. Then I put it back to stock speed and leave it.

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Guest Blooz1

I run the hell out of stability tests at stock speeds first.

 

If it won't pass those, it's a waste of time to O/C it!

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I get it stable and then I start to push it and if it breaks I can send it back, unless it was over volted they will never know. Then I put it back to stock speed and leave it.

 

wrong there are ways of testing RMA'd products (processors) if they have died from overvoltage or constant use of too much voltage.

not likely to be done but it could be.

 

Also I know the big corporations dont give a dogs mess about us in reality, but Its just wrong to RMA something that you have broken yourself.

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Also I know the big corporations dont give a dogs mess about us in reality, but Its just wrong to RMA something that you have broken yourself.

 

s1ick - thank you for putting in writing what I was thinking in my head, and before I went off on a rant.

 

shadrack - while you may do as you wish (and whatever your moral convictions allow) please do not post that here.

 

s1ick put it best, so I'll just leave it at that.

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