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Fogel

The End of DST... YAY!? -.-

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Ok I'm not buying the hype. Every year I have to hear people whining about pushing time ahead one hour and excitement about pushing it back. I understand already I think differently than most people, this place not excluded so figured this would be a good place to ask. Wide range of people (from one gamut to the other), different interests, not afraid to say they'll never change their mind.

 

Why is the end of Daylight Savings Time so great??? The only response I hear from people I know in person is, "Because we gain an hour!!!!!! We get to sleep an xtra hour!!!"

 

1 - We change on a Saturday so unless you go to church on Sunday, what's the big deal? I still sleep in no matter what and still require the same amount. You don't gain anything extra come the standard work week.

 

2 - You leave town and it throws off your recordings - yes, even my DVR. And yes, this complaint is for both sides, DST and end of DST

 

3 - It's still 24hrs a day =.=

 

4 - It gets dark a LOT earlier. Biggest part of problem is the season, now ur just compounding it with shifting time an hour back. That sh*ts depressing ...and I even consider myself a creature of the night.

 

5 - Got to change ALL your clocks AGAIN. Once again an annoyance on both sides.

 

 

I understand why we gotta do it but I'm not seeing why people get so excited for it. I say it sucks. Now someone prove me wrong so I can join the happy people.

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I guess I'm with you then...I never get excited about the beginning or ending of DST. I actually grow to hate DST when they change the dates since I have to then update 600+ computers :P

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if we didn't do DST, then within a few years or a decade it would be midnight in the middle of our human day and noon with the sky dark and moon hanging ;)

 

human calendars are pretty rigid...24 hours per day 365 days per year but the actual rotation of the earth and orbit around the sun aren't exact to our human terms of time/measurement (universe science tends to run into powers of 10 or a billion as well as down to minute fractions of seconds but rarely ever an EXACT rounded number like...60 seconds or 1,000,000 miles lol).

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I prefer DST where I am at...I dont like getting up and around to taking kids to school in a pitch black sky nor do I like going to work that way....

 

Neither do I like it getting dark at 8pm...it just sucks all the fun outta life after work hours....yea.... I know go to the bar and hang out and you dont need light outside...not for me man...got more important things to do outside...

 

I like it that they cater daylight to my work ethic hours....and such...it's just better for everyone around me that way....

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if we didn't do DST, then within a few years or a decade it would be midnight in the middle of our human day and noon with the sky dark and moon hanging ;)

Like I said, I understand WHY we do it. I just don't understand why people like Daylight Savings Time ending. Only pro I hear is... we sleep an extra hour!!!!! ...on a Sunday ...yipee

 

Move to Arizona. No Day-light savings there.

See I actually like DST. If I understood Bowtie correctly, I am like him. I LIKE it being light outside when I finish a normal work shift. I feel like I still have some of the day to do stuff. Between the combination of Winter and DST ending the day just feels shorter and more depressing. Go to work when its dark, leave when its dark. Bleh... That is why I don't understand why people like it when Daylight Savings Time ends. Summertime rules... I may be a creature of the night but I like the fact it doesn't get dark until 8 or 9pm in the summertime. So I probably wouldn't like Az for that reason. :P

 

Sounds sort of ominous for those of us with those initials.

lol sorry dude. I tailored my use of DST this message. :)

 

 

And momo... yeck... why doesn't your O/S handle that? :confused:

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No no...it handles DST normally but when they changed the actual dates that it takes place this past year then a patch had to be applied to all of the machines. Not a huge deal since I can do it all remotely but if a few machines missed the patch and were off by an hour then they wouldn't log on to the domain until the time is fixed. It's all XP Pro.

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if we didn't do DST, then within a few years or a decade it would be midnight in the middle of our human day and noon with the sky dark and moon hanging ;)

 

human calendars are pretty rigid...24 hours per day 365 days per year but the actual rotation of the earth and orbit around the sun aren't exact to our human terms of time/measurement (universe science tends to run into powers of 10 or a billion as well as down to minute fractions of seconds but rarely ever an EXACT rounded number like...60 seconds or 1,000,000 miles lol).

 

With all due respect to Angry_Games, DST does not affect the day/night cycle of 24 hours. That's because DST just "leaps" forward and back every year so it cancels itself out exactly. What really prevents us having daylight at midnight (in lower latitudes, of course) is the leap year and leap century. Even though there are 365 days in a normal calendar year, the actual sidereal year is approximately 365.25 years ... which is why we have leap year every four year (a leap year has 366 days, with February having 29 days.) Of course even that is not enough to keep our calendar in sync with the Earth's rotation around the sun. That is why we have leap centuries. Every 400 years, we have a leap century. For example, year 2000 was a leap century. What is a leap century? Year 2000 was supposed be a leap year (since 2000 is perfectly divisible by 4) but because it was a leap century, it only had 365 days instead of 366 days. This is what's keeping us from having midnight daylights. However, even that is not exact enough for people who really need precise times. Ever since the advent of the atomic clock, there is an agency that determines if we need to have a leap second. Since 1972, 17 leap seconds have been announced. This may not mean much for normal activities but where precise timing is required, this must be taken into account. Leap seconds are not periodical as it is based on the aberrations in earth's rotations. It is determine by a committee irregularly. Last leap second was announced in 2005. This is why spacecrafts use MET (Mission Elapsed Time) based on oscillating crystal in the onboard clock. Of course, these crystals also have drifts in oscillation. Some people really do not like leap seconds and have proposed getting rid of leap seconds by redefining UTC. Of course that is unlikely to happen.

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With all due respect to Angry_Games, DST does not affect the day/night cycle of 24 hours. That's because DST just "leaps" forward and back every year so it cancels itself out exactly. What really prevents us having daylight at midnight (in lower latitudes, of course) is the leap year and leap century. Even though there are 365 days in a normal calendar year, the actual sidereal year is approximately 365.25 years ... which is why we have leap year every four year (a leap year has 366 days, with February having 29 days.) Of course even that is not enough to keep our calendar in sync with the Earth's rotation around the sun. That is why we have leap centuries. Every 400 years, we have a leap century. For example, year 2000 was a leap century. What is a leap century? Year 2000 was supposed be a leap year (since 2000 is perfectly divisible by 4) but because it was a leap century, it only had 365 days instead of 366 days. This is what's keeping us from having midnight daylights. However, even that is not exact enough for people who really need precise times. Ever since the advent of the atomic clock, there is an agency that determines if we need to have a leap second. Since 1972, 17 leap seconds have been announced. This may not mean much for normal activities but where precise timing is required, this must be taken into account. Leap seconds are not periodical as it is based on the aberrations in earth's rotations. It is determine by a committee irregularly. Last leap second was announced in 2005. This is why spacecrafts use MET (Mission Elapsed Time) based on oscillating crystal in the onboard clock. Of course, these crystals also have drifts in oscillation. Some people really do not like leap seconds and have proposed getting rid of leap seconds by redefining UTC. Of course that is unlikely to happen.

 

some people just know some weird stuff

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Implementing Daylight Savings Time was an invention of conservation.

 

During World War I, the UK started using DST as a way of shifting the daylight hours away from the morning to the evenings. The US started using DST in 1918 as WWI continued.

 

Since I'm not a farmer and don't need the extra daylight hours in the morning, I'm a big fan of DST. With my position in the low latitudes and close to the middle of my Time Zone, I don't get a complete sunset until after 8:30pm at the Summer Solstice which means more fishing time.

 

Old Timer Alert!

 

Back during the "energy crisis" of the 1970's, we stayed on DST for a year so school started before full sunrise during the middle of the Winter. The best part was that we could play in the yard until almost 6:30 in the evenings.

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