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Russia - total transition to Linux


KimTjik
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A mix of economics, national pride, politic and maybe some lobbying have resulted in a quite spectacular decision concerning the school-system of Russia: in less than three years all computers are expected to run Linux!

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7034828.stm

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Since I've lived both in Russia and its neighboring countries I've had to deal with some issues in this field. Representatives of for example telecoms companies can prove to be totally incapable of understanding even basic network procedures if put in front of a non-Windows operating system. If they don't even have a clue about how to enable and setup a simple Ethernet device in Red Hat/Fedora it's starts to look ridiculous.

 

A little story: my mother-in-law lives in the Baltic. More than a year ago I installed a Fedora system to her (her first computer ever). Just for the fun of it included a tweaked down version of XP running as a guest in Qemu. She decided to change Internet provider, so I tech - or shall we say a so called tech - came to her home. He didn't understand squat when looking at a Fedora desktop system. So what do you think he tried to do? With a happy face he noticed the XP-icon, started up the virtual machine with great confidence in being able to configure the Ethernet card from there! Wow! Fortunately I could by phone guide them through some of the hassles - the main hassle being that he was incapable of accepting advice - so she got a perfectly working connection.

 

Anyway, my point is that for many countries the movements of the schooling system in Russia could become an eye-opener, proving that there exist totally legal options. It's also needed - as maybe my narrative exemplifies - to improve general computer knowledge which doesn't depend on any particular operating system.

 

Besides many already active coders, this might as well encourage a new generation of talented ones.

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There have always existed legal options, they just aren't as easy and not as widely used. Using Linux will be one thing in schools, will they teach Linux or will they just show them how to use the apps. I doubt the curriculum will change much, just the OS..

 

Thanks to LikeWhoa, my Linux and software knowledge has increased 10 fold. It's been worth the year I have spent at it.

 

My nephew has made the move to Linux at home, mainly due to the high price of Windows software but also he loves to learn. He needed office for some homework projects he was working on. Of course he doesn't have it at home so I introduced him to the world of open source and he just kept going with it. It was a much better move than having him torrent MS Office..

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Using Linux will be one thing in schools, will they teach Linux or will they just show them how to use the apps. I doubt the curriculum will change much, just the OS..

 

That's still huge though, just being partially familiar with it will make people more comfortable to use it at home. Besides, kids figure out all kinds of stuff they weren't told to on both Macs and Windows machines - they'll undoubtedly do the same on Linux.

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It is a huge step in the right direction. I am burnt out on proprietary software that isn't upgradeable but must be repurchased as new operating systems come out. Most of the software I run my business on is like this, unfortunately my calls for a Linux port of my automotive software has fallen on deaf ears.

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It is a huge step in the right direction. I am burnt out on proprietary software that isn't upgradeable but must be repurchased as new operating systems come out. Most of the software I run my business on is like this, unfortunately my calls for a Linux port of my automotive software has fallen on deaf ears.

 

 

I know what you mean...I run linux as my primary OS on all my computers, but I have to have windows XP on my systems because apparently there isn't much in the way of flash creators for slackware (I run fluxbox so alot of the libraries that I need aren't in my typical install). Not to mention companies that force you to use their pos (Point of Sale...I know what you were thinking) software in the environment that they choose...hopefully this will change as Linux is seen as a more and more viable option for an OS...

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It is a huge step in the right direction. I am burnt out on proprietary software that isn't upgradeable but must be repurchased as new operating systems come out. Most of the software I run my business on is like this, unfortunately my calls for a Linux port of my automotive software has fallen on deaf ears.

 

depending on the application and it's dependencies, you might be able to emulate it in WINE, or you can just run VM inside Linux unless that application depends on hardware that the VM can't provide native access.

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