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turok_t

heatspeader pulled off

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Hey guys, i pulled the heatspreader for my 3700 San diego. Is there any way how I can put the lid back on ??? Thanks for your input and advice, greatly appreciate it.

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Yes....

 

The substance used to seal the lid originaly is a black RTV silicon...

 

you can buy a tube of this anywhere...(Auto parts store)

 

if you lightly dab a little tiny bit over the existing all you have to do is re-seat it...

 

put the TIM of your choice on the core and re-attach the lid put something on it with even pressure or if you think you can do it squarely I would put the CPU in the board socket and clamp down the heatsink...

 

I would use Scotch tape and tape the lid so it cannot move in either direction and set it that way...all in all the RTV will re-seal the lid...just make sure you leave the factory air gap open to avoid damage...;)

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Hi thanks for your reply Dr Bowtie.. does TIM = thermal paste?? If so, what would u recommend? AS5?? How much of the paste do i put and do i spread it evenly on the core like how i would normally do it? The reason why im asking is to ensure that the heat is transferred MOST EFFICIENTLY from the core to the heatspreader.. Thanks for all your help again!

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Hi thanks for your reply Dr Bowtie.. does TIM = thermal paste?? If so, what would u recommend? AS5?? How much of the paste do i put and do i spread it evenly on the core like how i would normally do it? The reason why im asking is to ensure that the heat is transferred MOST EFFICIENTLY from the core to the heatspreader.. Thanks for all your help again!

 

Time for me to hijack :)

 

TIM = Thermal Interface Material = thermal paste. I usually use AS Ceramique because it's cheaper than AS5 here and is nonconductive, but most if not all will recommend AS5.

 

Generally use a rice grain-sized lump of thermal paste and place it on the center of the chip's heatspreader. Alternatively, you can spread it with a credit card/business card, but I just let the pressure of the heatsink and heat spread the paste out. I've been using the grain-sized method with pretty good results.

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Thats pretty much it....

 

I dont know that I would use AS-5 as with some serious clocking it has a tendancy to harden and needeing to be re-done in time...

 

I have been using the Thermalright white stuff with excelent results...

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Time for me to hijack :)

 

TIM = Thermal Interface Material = thermal paste. I usually use AS Ceramique because it's cheaper than AS5 here and is nonconductive, but most if not all will recommend AS5.

 

Generally use a rice grain-sized lump of thermal paste and place it on the center of the chip's heatspreader. Alternatively, you can spread it with a credit card/business card, but I just let the pressure of the heatsink and heat spread the paste out. I've been using the grain-sized method with pretty good results.

 

I was not referring between the IHS and the heatsink. Im referring to the CORE and the IHS.... I want to know how much AS5 i put on the CORE and how WELL i should spread it on the CORE because i want maximal heat efficiency betweeen the CORE and the IHS

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I was not referring between the IHS and the heatsink. Im referring to the CORE and the IHS.... I want to know how much AS5 i put on the CORE and how WELL i should spread it on the CORE because i want maximal heat efficiency betweeen the CORE and the IHS

 

Well, then, excuse me for not properly reading.

 

Though I've never been in this situation before, I would probably use a half grain-sized piece and spread it evenly with a business/credit card.

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in those cases you would follow the instructions for putting the TIM on and Athlon-XP CPU...

 

you can find those instructions on the AS5 site...;)

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Well, then, excuse me for not properly reading.

 

Though I've never been in this situation before, I would probably use a half grain-sized piece and spread it evenly with a business/credit card.

 

a safer and more precise method (so as not to scrape/chip the die) is to put your hand into an inside-out plastic sandwich baggie and gently spread and tap the half-grain of TIM into place thinly and evenly with your index finger. You can wind up with a coat so even and thin that you can kind of see the die through it.

 

I second the suggestion that Ceramique works better than AS5 for long-term applications...i.e. core/IHS interface or naked mounts. AS5 is marginally better than Ceramique but requires reapplication at some point (usually).

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Hawkeyefan's suggestion is a very good one... I'd never have thought of that.

 

Now that I remember, when I was changing the stock fan on the stock AMD HSF of an Athlon XP, I just put a half-grain size piece on the core and let the heatsink do the rest. Temps never exceeded 48C with a 400MHz overclock (2500 to 3200).

 

But since the core is bigger here, and you're reapplying a heatspreader, I would spread it using Hawkeye's method.

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Guest Blooz1

Back in the day of naked Athlons, we used single-edged razor blades to spread the TIM evenly, going from corner to corner.

(These are commonly used in paint scrapers and box cutters, can be found in hardware or paint stores.)

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